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White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
hand places ballot in box

New remote voting risks and solutions identified

The upcoming presidential election in the middle of a pandemic has many jurisdictions exploring new technologies. They're not secure. |Medium Read
Illustration of growing cancer tumor.

New machine learning method improves testing of stem-like tumor cells for breast cancer research

To improve the prediction and identification of stem-like cancer cells, Prof. Euisik Yoon’s group developed a method that is 3.5 times faster than the standard approach. |Short Read
Hot electrons travel along the molecule into the probe tip. The molecule only allows electrons within a narrow range of energies to pass.

First measurement of electron energy distributions

The new tool could enable the design of more efficient sustainable energy and chemistry technologies.|Medium Read
Shilva Shrestha, Environmental Engineering PhD Student, has her temperature checked by Bryan Daniels, DPSS Quartermaster, at the entrance the G.G. Brown Building on North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI on May 26, 2020.

Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

'Noncritical' in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.|Medium Read
The public-facing dashboard uses a color-coded map of the state with breakdowns by region and county.

Web app, dashboard from U-M to inform Michiganders’ return to work

The web tools will help state officials identify potential hotspots as they reopen Michigan to business.|Medium Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read
ADA zoom image

ADA Center holds 2020 symposium with virtual attendance, highlighting new research into computer design

The symposium highlighted new developments in computer architecture, and included a session on how the center's research can contribute to limiting the impact of pandemics.|Short Read
Hurricane Model

From resilience to adaptation: The case of hurricanes

Researchers bring together interdependent data to build communities that are resilient to disasters.|Medium Read
Graphic of contrast test

Research on human biases in AI learning earns best student paper award

The project demonstrated that a certain bias in humans who train intelligent agents significantly reduced the effectiveness of the training.|Medium Read
The experimental flow loop that will be used to emulate the cooling loop in a molten salt reactor

$5.2M for digital twins of nuclear reactors could bring down nuclear energy costs

Virtual copies of nuclear reactors could enable smarter maintenance for current reactors and more automation for advanced reactors.|Medium Read

Get to know: Xinyu Wang

“My research has the potential to democratize programming and make it possible for millions of people around the globe to automate otherwise tedious tasks using programming.”|Short Read