Research

More Research News

Flexible wings, COVID-19, and the future of commercial aviation

At the June 2017 Paris Airshow, Airbus entered into a five-year agreement with the University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering department to establish and fund, to the tune of $8.25 million, a new research center. Called the Airbus-University of Michigan Center for Aero-Servo-Elasticity of Very Flexible Aircraft, its purpose is to engage in fundamental research, focusing on advanced methodologies for designing and evaluating future aircraft. We recently caught up with the Center's director, Dr. Carlos Cesnik, and asked him about the work being done there, the aircraft of the future, and the impact of the recent COVID-19 crisis on the aerospace industry.|Medium Read
Kamal Sarabandi and Navid Barani

Improving cancer and disease treatments by understanding electromagnetic communication among biological cells

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi and ECE PhD student Navid Barani won a best paper award for their research on how biological cells may use electromagnetic signal transmission to communicate.|Short Read
Post-implosion images of the plasma cylinders. On the left, plasma tentacles stretch out from the sides of the conventional, straight-column design. With the 14-tesla and 20-tesla twisted structures in the middle and right, respectively, the plasma tentacles are much shorter. This reflects more uniform compression by the magnetic field. Credit: Paul Campbell; Plasma, Pulsed Power and Microwave Lab; University of Michigan.

Twisting magnetic fields for extreme plasma compression

When magnetic walls are closing in, wily plasma slips out between magnetic field lines. A Michigan-led team pioneered a way to keep more plasma contained.|Medium Read
Jason Flinn

Jason Flinn earns Test of Time award for 1999 invention of adaptable battery use in mobile apps

The approaches to energy adaptation he proposed are now commonplace, and the applications he analyzed (web browsers, voice recognition, video players, and maps) are still ubiquitous.|Short Read
A stock image depicting coronavirus testing

How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.|Medium Read

Viswanath Nagarajan receives NSF funding for research in combinatorial optimization

U-M IOE assistant professor, Viswanath Nagarajan, has received NSF funding for further research on decision-making under uncertainty.|Short Read
Ester Bentley

Ester Bentley receives NDSEG Fellowship to help the world navigate without GPS

PhD student Ester Bentley designs smaller, better 3D mechanical resonators for use in high-performance gyroscopes to help unmanned systems navigate when GPS signal is jammed or lost. |Short Read
New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective.|Medium Read
The prototype of a wirelessly powered, RFID-based sensor.

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”|Medium Read
Brian Ellis

Brian Ellis awarded Sloan Foundation “net zero” grant

The Alfred P. Sloan grant funds projects furthering technologies that sequester carbon or have zero emissions. |Short Read
Chad Jenkins, CSE Associate Professor, poses with his research group's two robots, Odd Job and Cookie, in the Beyster Building on October 27, 2016

Technology that serves all: a single step could pave the way

A Q&A with Chad Jenkins.|Medium Read