Cancer

A new microfluidic chip designed to catch circulating tumor cells

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment. |Medium Read
Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read
The wearable device measures roughly 2 x 2.75 x 1 inches, with the cancer-cell-capturing chip mounted on top. The catheter connecting to the patient runs through the hole in the top left corner. Illustration by Tae Hyun Kim, Nagrath Lab, University of Michigan.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.|Medium Read
Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies.|Short Read
An oil refinery at night.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring|Medium Read

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.|Short Read
A microscopic image of a human tumor xenograft that glows red and blue from fluorescent dyes.

Findings in mice show pill for breast cancer diagnosis may outperform mammograms

A new kind of imaging could distinguish aggressive tumors from benign, preventing unnecessary breast cancer treatments.|Medium Read
A 3D grid

Microscale 3D printing for medicine

New “jet writing” technique can make detailed 3D structures with clinically relevant materials for future implants and cancer studies.|Medium Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

“Labyrinth” chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells

A breast cancer clinical trial relies on a hydrodynamic maze to capture cancer stem cells from patient blood.|Short Read

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.|Medium Read

Tiny device offers insight into how cancer spreads

Researchers have developed a fluidic device to track over time which cancer cells lead the disease’s invasive march.|Medium Read