Cancer

Fibronectin network with cells.

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

While previous structures guessed at the environment that cells would want, the new design lets the cells build to their own specifications.|Medium Read
Biomedical Engineering graduate student research assistant Menglian Zhou, adjusts the lung monitoring device.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.|Medium Read

Prof. Louise Willingale creates extreme plasma conditions using high-intensity laser pulses

Willingale’s research in plasma physics advances many research areas from spectacular astrophysical phenomena to cancer treatment to fusion power.|Medium Read

By Cannibalizing Nearby Stromal Stem Cells, Some Breast Cancer Cells Gain Invasion Advantage

Cancer biologists and engineers collaborated on a device that could help predict the likelihood of breast cancer metastasis.|Medium Read
Researcher wearing blue gloves works in the lab

Cancer is smarter than you think: Q&A with Geeta Mehta

Decoding the sophisticated inner workings of cancer may help us fight it.|Medium Read
A new microfluidic chip designed to catch circulating tumor cells

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment. |Medium Read
Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read
The wearable device measures roughly 2 x 2.75 x 1 inches, with the cancer-cell-capturing chip mounted on top. The catheter connecting to the patient runs through the hole in the top left corner. Illustration by Tae Hyun Kim, Nagrath Lab, University of Michigan.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.|Medium Read
Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies.|Short Read
An oil refinery at night.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring|Medium Read

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.|Short Read
A microscopic image of a human tumor xenograft that glows red and blue from fluorescent dyes.

Findings in mice show pill for breast cancer diagnosis may outperform mammograms

A new kind of imaging could distinguish aggressive tumors from benign, preventing unnecessary breast cancer treatments.|Medium Read