Cancer

More Cancer News
Scientist holding a blood sample

A blood test can predict early lung cancer prognosis

Cancer cells traveling in groups through the bloodstream may signal the need for further treatment.|Medium Read
Scientist in the lab

‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

Michigan engineers release individual cells from a specially-designed chip using laser pulses.|Medium Read
Brian Denton

How precision medicine is improving prostate cancer treatment

New, statistically-derived guidelines could potentially save millions of prostate patients from painful and invasive follow-up treatments. |Medium Read
This illustration depicts a side view of proteins (blue) flowing through two electrically charged nanopores

‘5-D protein fingerprinting’ could help fight Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s

In an advance that could lead to new progress against diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, researchers have demonstrated a technique for measuring the properties of individual protein molecules.|Medium Read
Rhonda Jack looks through a slide in the lab. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing.

Unstoppable

Chemical engineering graduate student Rhonda Jack's journey to become a published researcher|Short Read
Illustration of cancer cell colonies growing in the chip

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new tool for making sense of the cells believed to cause cancer relapses and metastases.|Medium Read
Aerospace Engineering logo

AE Dept collaborates with Mott’s Children’s Hospital to raise cancer awareness

The Aerospace Engineering Department collaborated with Mott’s Children’s Hospital on their Block Out Cancer campaign to promote awareness of childhood cancer. |Short Read
This illustration shows how the device attracts cancer cells.

Implantable decoy could limit metastatic breast cancer

A small device implanted under the skin can improve breast cancer survival by catching cancer cells, slowing the development of metastatic tumors in other organs and allowing time to intervene with surgery or other therapies.|Medium Read
Red laser light hits glass slide.

Turning blood into a laser emitter for drug testing, cancer treatment

University of Michigan researchers have successfully demonstrated a new technique that combines laser light with an FDA-approved fluorescent dye to monitor cell structure and activity at the molecular level. This could lead to improved clinical imaging and better monitoring of tumors and other cell structures. It could also be used during drug testing to monitor the changes that cells undergo when exposed to prospective new drugs.|Short Read
The device captures cancer cells from a blood sample.

Blood biopsy: Releasing cancer cells for better analysis

A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment. |Medium Read
Yoonseob Kim, ChE PhD Student, showcases the material used to make a flexible film that induces circular polarization of light.

Flexible film may lead to phone-sized cancer detector

A thin, stretchable film that can coil light waves like a Slinky could usher in more precise, less expensive monitoring for cancer survivors, helping them get better treatment with less disruption to their everyday lives.|Medium Read
U-M Researchers construct cancer "super-attractor" scaffolds from mouse tissue

Cancer “decoy” shows potential for breast cancer treatment

A small, implantable device that researchers are calling a cancer "super-attractor" could eventually give doctors an early warning of relapse in breast cancer patients and even slow the disease’s spread to other organs in the body.|Medium Read