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Large seawalls are effective at cutting tsunami deaths

Seawalls higher than approximately 16 feet can effectively reduce tsunami-related damage and death, according to a new study that applies big-data analytics to more than 200 years of tsunami records from the Pacific coast of Japan’s Tohoku region. |Medium Read

Researchers David Adrian and Alex Halderman receive Pwnie Award for work on DROWN attack

DROWN allows attackers to break encryption used to protect HTTPS websites and read or steal sensitive communications.|Medium Read
Let's Encrypt logo

With over 7 million certificates issued, Let’s Encrypt aims to secure the entire web

In order to bring HTTPS to everyone, Prof. Halderman joined forces in 2012 with colleagues at Mozilla and the Electronic Frontier Foundation to found Let's Encrypt, a non-profit certificate authority with the mission of making the switch to HTTPS vastly easier.|Medium Read
Prof. Zhuoqing Morley Mao

Michigan and Verisign researchers demonstrate new man-in-the-middle WPAD query attack

New security ramifications exist when laptops and smartphones configured for enterprise systems are used outside the enterprise in the realm of the wider web.|Medium Read
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Fighting cyber crime with data analytics

QuadMetrics offers a pair of services to help companies both assess the effectiveness of their security and decide the best way to allocate (or increase) their security budget.|Medium Read
Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences

Toward universal cargo scans for nuclear weapon materials

Current methods produce high radiation doses, but a gentler scan has proven to be effective.|Short Read
A fingertip touches a small, green 3D printed sensor.

3D-printed strain sensors could spot damage aboard ships

A 3D printable strain sensor developed by University of Michigan researchers could provide the U.S. Navy and commercial shippers with a more accurate, less expensive way to assess damage to their vessels, helping to keep sailors safe in the aftermath of an attack, storm or other incident.|Medium Read
Portrait of Sara Pozzi

Michigan Engineering professor named among top physicists

Pozzi’s paper in the virtual issue improved on a standard simulation code used to model how a radiation source appears in a detector.|Short Read
Map of North Korea

U-M-led team analyzes North Korea nuclear weapon test

Nuclear nonproliferation consortium finds that North Korea is unlikely to have detonated a hydrogen bomb.|Medium Read
Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences

U-M and other CVT scientists study explosion in North Korea

Members of the Consortium for Verification Technology weigh in on magnitude of January 6, 2016 North Korean tests.|Short Read
Students demonstrate use of their device

A showcase of student innovation

The most ambitious and intense class projects of students’ undergraduate careers are showcased each semester at Design Expo. More than 100 teams display the prototypes they’ve spent months designing and refining. |Short Read
Facial expressions and hand gesture of liars in court

Lie-detecting software uses real court case data

U-M researchers are building a unique lie-detecting software that works from studying real world data from real, high-stakes court cases.|Medium Read