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Researcher wearing blue gloves works in the lab

Cancer is smarter than you think: Q&A with Geeta Mehta

Decoding the sophisticated inner workings of cancer may help us fight it.|Medium Read
Heart rate monitor

Research responsible for establishing field of medical device security recognized by IEEE

Defibrillator security paper receives Test of Time Award from IEEE Security & Privacy|Medium Read
A new microfluidic chip designed to catch circulating tumor cells

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment. |Medium Read
A doctor uses a stethoscope to examine another person

Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness

Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.|Medium Read
Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Herek Clack (left) talks to Zijie Lin, CEE student

Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses, study shows

Combining virus deactivation and filtration is highly effective against contaminated air.|Medium Read
Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read
The wearable device measures roughly 2 x 2.75 x 1 inches, with the cancer-cell-capturing chip mounted on top. The catheter connecting to the patient runs through the hole in the top left corner. Illustration by Tae Hyun Kim, Nagrath Lab, University of Michigan.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.|Medium Read
Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies.|Short Read
Navid Barani

Unravelling the mysteries of bacterial communication

EECS-ECE PhD student Navid Barani received the IEEE APS Doctoral Research Award for his work modeling how bacteria use electromagnetic waves to communicate, which could lead to medical breakthroughs.|Medium Read
Photo of Ruiwei Jiang

Ruiwei Jiang receives National Science Foundation Career Award

Ruiwei Jiang, U-M IOE assistant professor, receives a National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award for his work in operations research.|Short Read
An oil refinery at night.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring|Medium Read

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

The papers provide data-driven solutions to hospital infection and the use of machine learning in healthcare.|Short Read