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A researcher holds a petri dish containing clostridium difficile bacteria

Preventing deadly hospital infections with machine learning

Model successfully applied to data from medical centers with different patient populations, electronic health record systems|Medium Read
Concentrated surgeon performing surgery with her team

No sponge left behind: tags for surgical equipment

A simple, easy-to-implement technology could prevent the debilitating injuries that can occur when organs are damaged by surgical tools left in the body.|Medium Read
A 3D grid

Microscale 3D printing for medicine

New “jet writing” technique can make detailed 3D structures with clinically relevant materials for future implants and cancer studies.|Medium Read

Cuba ‘sonic attacks’: A covert accident?

‘We've demonstrated a scenario in which the harm might have been unintentional.’|Short Read
Human hand holding the everter device

Reconstructive surgery tech

Born in an engineering class, now the ‘arterial everter’ has been licensed to Baxter.|Medium Read

Electricity, eel-style: Soft power cells could run tomorrow’s implantables

Device generates over 100 volts from saltwater.|Short Read

Artificial cartilage made from Kevlar mimics the magic of the real thing

In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength.|Medium Read

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

White blood cells get busy taking out the trash - it could be a lifesaver when the immune system goes haywire.|Short Read
nerve cells

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance

An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.|Medium Read

Doubling the power of the world’s most intense laser

It could enable tabletop particle and X-ray sources as well as the investigation of astrophysics and quantum dynamics.|Medium Read