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Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read
The wearable device measures roughly 2 x 2.75 x 1 inches, with the cancer-cell-capturing chip mounted on top. The catheter connecting to the patient runs through the hole in the top left corner. Illustration by Tae Hyun Kim, Nagrath Lab, University of Michigan.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.|Medium Read
Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies.|Short Read
Navid Barani

Unravelling the mysteries of bacterial communication

EECS-ECE PhD student Navid Barani received the IEEE APS Doctoral Research Award for his work modeling how bacteria use electromagnetic waves to communicate, which could lead to medical breakthroughs.|Medium Read
Photo of Ruiwei Jiang

Ruiwei Jiang receives National Science Foundation Career Award

Ruiwei Jiang, U-M IOE assistant professor, receives a National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award for his work in operations research.|Short Read
An oil refinery at night.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring|Medium Read

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

The papers provide data-driven solutions to hospital infection and the use of machine learning in healthcare.|Short Read
Man talks into his phone for a voice command

Detecting Huntington’s disease with an algorithm that analyzes speech

New, preliminary research found automated speech test accurately diagnoses Huntington’s disease 81 percent of the time and tracks the disease’s progression.|Medium Read

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Genome sequencing could be as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing.|Short Read
Construction workers installing pipes as part of the G.G. Brown addition. Photo: Marcin Szczepanski/Michigan Engineering

Getting smart about construction safety

A Q&A with the professor who wants to fit construction workers with health-monitoring sensors.|Medium Read
View of Bakken shale in North Dakota from a plane in flight

Oil, gas methane emissions 60 percent higher than EPA reports

Gas leaks estimated to be worth $2 billion could have fueled 10 million homes.|Short Read
Magnified nanoparticles

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

With a bit of metal, nanoparticles shine in colors based on size.|Medium Read