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featured Health stories
Eyke holds the kirigami in hand

Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training

Low-cost sensors could one day enable patients to log exercise and track progress in a smartphone app|Medium Read
Surgeons operating

How opt-out organ donation could affect U.S. waiting lists

A lack of consent plays a role in preventing donation from up to 40% of otherwise eligible donors. |Medium Read
Fibronectin network with cells.

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

While previous structures guessed at the environment that cells would want, the new design lets the cells build to their own specifications.|Medium Read
Scientists in a lab

U-M team to build synthetic neurons – first challenge in making synthetic cells

Seven U.S. research institutions look to build synthetic cells|Medium Read
Photo of Leia Stirling

Leia Stirling joins the Industrial and Operations Engineering faculty

Leia Stirling will join the U-M IOE faculty as an associate professor this fall. |Short Read
Biomedical Engineering graduate student research assistant Menglian Zhou, adjusts the lung monitoring device.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.|Medium Read
Inspecting the injectable bone graft.

Injectable ‘bone spackling’: A cell therapy approach to heal complex fractures

A Q&A with biomedical engineering professor Jan Stegemann, whose work in mice shows the promise of ‘microtissues.’|Medium Read
Jenna Wiens portrate

Jenna Wiens Named New Precision Health Co-Director

Wiens is transitioning to Co-Director from a successful role as a Co-Lead for Precision Health’s Data Analytics & IT Workgroup, which expanded access to data and research tools across the university.|Short Read
Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
A Kirigami lattice. Photo: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering

Kirigami can spin terahertz rays in real time to peer into biological tissue

The rays used by airport scanners might have a future in medical imaging.|Medium Read

By Cannibalizing Nearby Stromal Stem Cells, Some Breast Cancer Cells Gain Invasion Advantage

Cancer biologists and engineers collaborated on a device that could help predict the likelihood of breast cancer metastasis.|Medium Read
A diagram of cochlea

Cracking the cochlea: U-M team creates mathematical model of ear’s speech center

New research paves the way for modeling the transduction of speech and music at the cochlear level.|Medium Read