Health

featured Health stories
Portrait of Euisik Yoon.

Euisik Yoon presents the 2017 LNF User Symposium keynote address

The keynote was titled, "Biointerface Technologies: Where Engineering Meets Science and Medicine."|Short Read

Kevlar-based artificial cartilage mimics the magic of the real thing

In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength.|Medium Read

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

White blood cells get busy taking out the trash - it could be a lifesaver when the immune system goes haywire.|Short Read
nerve cells

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance

An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.|Medium Read

Doubling the power of the world’s most intense laser

It could enable tabletop particle and X-ray sources as well as the investigation of astrophysics and quantum dynamics.|Medium Read
nagrath-melanoma-device

Teaming up to tackle melanoma recurrence with microfluidics

Graduate student Heather Fairbairn and Associate Professor Sunitha Nagrath are developing a microfluidic technology that could revolutionize melanoma care and treatment. |Short Read
Student works in the lab

Printed meds could reinvent pharmacies, drug research

A new process can print multiple medications onto a single dissolvable strip, microneedle patch or other surface.|Medium Read

“Labyrinth” chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells

A breast cancer clinical trial relies on a hydrodynamic maze to capture cancer stem cells from patient blood.|Short Read

Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center

Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.|Medium Read

Tiny device offers insight into how cancer spreads

Researchers have developed a fluidic device to track over time which cancer cells lead the disease’s invasive march.|Medium Read