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New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
The prototype of a wirelessly powered, RFID-based sensor.

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”|Medium Read
detroit skyline

Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.|Medium Read
View of the North Campus Bell Tower blocked by caution tape

Students lead the way on State of Michigan web application to help curb the spread of COVID-19

“I don’t think any of us expected a global pandemic at the end of our senior year, let alone being able to work on an application that helps address it.”|Medium Read
The HEAT camera

Turning faces into thermostats

An autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy.|Medium Read
A look at the prototype.

Graduate students create new N95 testing kits for Michigan Medicine

As PPE supplies fluctuate, a collaborative team steps in to create a locally sourced N95 test kit to help healthcare workers get masks faster.|Short Read
Ying’s algorithm reconstructs the spread of an entity such as an illness from single or multiple sources.

Tracking COVID-19 spread faster, and more accurately

A new application for an ongoing NSF project could bolster contract tracing efforts.|Medium Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
Illustration of growing cancer tumor.

New machine learning method improves testing of stem-like tumor cells for breast cancer research

To improve the prediction and identification of stem-like cancer cells, Prof. Euisik Yoon’s group developed a method that is 3.5 times faster than the standard approach. |Short Read
Shilva Shrestha, Environmental Engineering PhD Student, has her temperature checked by Bryan Daniels, DPSS Quartermaster, at the entrance the G.G. Brown Building on North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI on May 26, 2020.

Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

'Noncritical' in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.|Medium Read
The public-facing dashboard uses a color-coded map of the state with breakdowns by region and county.

Web app, dashboard from U-M to inform Michiganders’ return to work

The web tools will help state officials identify potential hotspots as they reopen Michigan to business.|Medium Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read