A student holding a MiTEE cubeset

Pioneering a way to keep very small satellites in orbit

More than 250 students had a hand in a satellite scheduled to launch on January 17th, the first in space for a project to keep nanosats in orbit by harnessing Earth’s magnetic field. |Medium Read
Ann Arbor intersection

$9.95M for “smart intersections” across Ann Arbor

Technology embedded in existing infrastructure will provide data to connected and automated vehicles, bolstering safety.|Medium Read
Municipal sewage treatment plant

‘Peecycling’ payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale

New study is the first in-depth analysis of the environmental performance and benefits of large-scale urine recycling relative to conventional wastewater treatment and fertilizer production.|Medium Read
A student participating in Professor Chesney's 495 course.

Lessons learned from quick pivots to online education

How a U-M computer science lecturer reimagined his software design class in a COVID-safe format.|Medium Read

Dentistry during COVID-19: Engineering analysis offers guidelines to reduce exposure

Equipment previously used in auto emissions testing highlights risks.|Medium Read
Manhole cover on a road

More responsive COVID-19 wastewater test developed

Measuring RNA from SARS-COV-2 allows for more accurate testing than similar methods.|Medium Read
Lonnie Shea and Eiji Saito

Treating autoimmune disorders with an inhaler, rather than an IV

Research in mice shows efficacy for multiple sclerosis.|Medium Read
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors.|Medium Read
Detroit city skyline

U-M, community partners tackle energy insecurity in three Detroit neighborhoods

Johanna Mathieu is one of four principal investigators on a project to improve home energy efficiency and to lower monthly utility bills.|Medium Read

Podcast: Artificial photosynthesis for sustainable solar fuels

In S1E1, unlocking quantum properties to close the loop on carbon emissions.|Long Read
water infrastructure

Podcast: Remaking water infrastructure

In S1E2, harnessing waterborne microbes for data and health.|Long Read
carbon negative

Podcast: Carbon negative, dollar positive

In S1E3, mining CO2 from the air and recycling it into useful products.|Long Read