The Michigan Engineer News Center

School bus safety during the COVID-19 pandemic: 8 recommendations

In The Conversation, Capecelatro offers suggestions like keeping windows open, shorter trips and below half-capacity seating on public buses.| Short Read

Short trips. Masks for everyone. Far fewer passengers than before.

Those are my top recommendations for how America’s school buses should take kids to and from school during the pandemic.

I am a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering who studies the flow physics of particles and droplets. Since March, I have worked with my University of Michigan colleagues to measure COVID-19 risks on the buses college students use to get around our campus.

Based on our guidance, those buses now follow routes that take 15 minutes at most to complete, down from as long as 45 minutes before the pandemic. All passengers must wear masks, and the maximum occupancy is half of what it used to be. My recommendations for K-12 buses are similar.

This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the full article.

Portrait of Nicole Casal Moore

Contact

Nicole Casal Moore
Media Relations & Research News Director

Michigan Engineering
Communications & Marketing

(734) 647-7087

3214 SI-North

Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read