COVID-19

MISymtomsApp

How a COVID-19 app built at U-Michigan is helping businesses stay open

New real-time employer dashboards provide "live-feed of data" as employees report their symptoms while also safeguarding users' data privacy.|Medium Read
Lissa MacVean, a lecturer in civil and environmental engineering, teaches her graduate course outside. Photo by Joseph Xu

Caution and connection in in-person classes during COVID-19

Faculty members and students share their perspectives.|Medium Read
Myofibroblasts can be seen accumulating in the 3d lung connective tissue model even in soft conditions mimicking a healthy lung. Image is stained for cytoskeleton (blue), cell nuclei (yellow), and a marker for myofibroblast activation (alpha-smooth muscle actin, red). Credit: Baker Lab.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options. |Medium Read
Portrait of Sridhar Kota

The pandemic has revealed the cracks in US manufacturing: Here’s how to fix them

The global pandemic has interrupted supply chains for almost 75% of US companies.|Short Read

School bus safety during the COVID-19 pandemic: 8 recommendations

In The Conversation, Capecelatro offers suggestions like keeping windows open, shorter trips and below half-capacity seating on public buses.|Short Read
North campus’ Grove and Duderstadt during fall 2018. Photo: Evan Dougherty

What have we learned in 2020—and what can we do better?

"Our values will continue to be put to the test this fall. But I’m cautiously optimistic the global community will rise to the challenge. I have no doubt that Michigan Engineering will."|Medium Read
Ensafi portrait

U-M spinout Asalyxa Bio developing inflammatory treatment platform, aiding COVID-19 patients

The company’s technology delivers an anti-inflammatory agent directly to overreactive neutrophils, minimizing harm from “cytokine storms.”|Medium Read

The science behind campus bus changes during COVID-19

Engineers used smoke machines, physics-based modeling and route optimization algorithms to quantify risk.|Medium Read
the moon

Deciding how and whether to reopen schools is complex – here’s how rocket scientists would develop a plan

The United States approach to sending astronauts to the moon could help inform our response to COVID-19.|Short Read
TrainTime's capacity view in front of a train

Student developer builds Long Island commuters a safer, more accurate train app

CS undergrad Ryan O’Connor led front-end development on a major update to Long Island Rail Road’s TrainTime app, helping the country’s biggest commuter line offer socially distanced service.|Medium Read
An N95 mask testing device

All masks are not created equal

Michigan Engineers test to evaluate safety.|Short Read

Flexible wings, COVID-19, and the future of commercial aviation

At the June 2017 Paris Airshow, Airbus entered into a five-year agreement with the University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering department to establish and fund, to the tune of $8.25 million, a new research center. Called the Airbus-University of Michigan Center for Aero-Servo-Elasticity of Very Flexible Aircraft, its purpose is to engage in fundamental research, focusing on advanced methodologies for designing and evaluating future aircraft. We recently caught up with the Center's director, Dr. Carlos Cesnik, and asked him about the work being done there, the aircraft of the future, and the impact of the recent COVID-19 crisis on the aerospace industry.|Medium Read