COVID-19

Dusk on the Eda U. Gerstacker Grove on North Campus of the University of Michigan on October 25, 2016.

Making a socially distant campus ‘feel more like home’: Students offer ideas

As campuses across the nation move towards the challenges of fall semester, there’s well-spring of innovation and creativity coming from students. |Medium Read
The prototype of a wirelessly powered, RFID-based sensor.

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”|Medium Read
A group of students test out the Mi-TEE cubesat

84 internships and research fellowships for the pandemic summer

When summer internships fell through, Michigan Engineering staff scrambled to make sure students would still have access to experiential learning.|Medium Read
detroit skyline

Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.|Medium Read
North campus’ Grove and Duderstadt during fall 2018. Photo: Evan Dougherty

Emergency fund fills in gaps for students during pandemic

Donations will help address a variety of issues.|Medium Read
Artist rendering of COVID-19

COVID-19 is laying waste to many US recycling programs

'The trends we see in the making and consuming of single-use goods, particularly plastic, could have lasting negative effects on the circular economy.'|Short Read
View of the North Campus Bell Tower blocked by caution tape

Students lead the way on State of Michigan web application to help curb the spread of COVID-19

“I don’t think any of us expected a global pandemic at the end of our senior year, let alone being able to work on an application that helps address it.”|Medium Read
Dr. David Chesney

Engineering course challenges students to create tech solutions for COVID-19

'When caught in a situation such as this, creatively and positively helping others is always an excellent endeavor.'|Long Read
The HEAT camera

Turning faces into thermostats

An autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy.|Medium Read
A look at the prototype.

Graduate students create new N95 testing kits for Michigan Medicine

As PPE supplies fluctuate, a collaborative team steps in to create a locally sourced N95 test kit to help healthcare workers get masks faster.|Short Read
Ying’s algorithm reconstructs the spread of an entity such as an illness from single or multiple sources.

Tracking COVID-19 spread faster, and more accurately

A new application for an ongoing NSF project could bolster contract tracing efforts.|Medium Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read