Precision Health

More Precision Health News

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.|Medium Read
Scientist in the lab

New class of antibiotics: nanobiotics

U-M researchers Nicholas Kotov and J. Scott VanEpps are collaborating to create a new class of antibiotics known as nanobiotics.|Short Read
Portrait of Jenna Weins

Precision health pioneer named to MIT Technology Review innovator list

The national magazine recognized Jenna Wiens as one of 2017's 35 Innovators Under 35.|Short Read
Brian Denton

How precision medicine is improving prostate cancer treatment

New, statistically-derived guidelines could potentially save millions of prostate patients from painful and invasive follow-up treatments. |Medium Read

The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.|Medium Read
sound wave graphic

Super-fine sound beam could one day be an invisible scalpel

"We believe this could be used as an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery," Guo said. "Nothing pokes into your body, just the ultrasound beam."|Short Read
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EECS students help the deaf “Feel the Music”

The competition sought solutions for a better way for the deaf and hearing-impaired population to appreciate music.|Short Read

Gérard A. Mourou: In pursuit of new directions in science

“The future of CUOS is bright,” said Mourou. “Nothing will stop the flow of discoveries.”|Medium Read