Precision Health

Jenna Wiens portrate

Jenna Wiens Named New Precision Health Co-Director

Wiens is transitioning to Co-Director from a successful role as a Co-Lead for Precision Health’s Data Analytics & IT Workgroup, which expanded access to data and research tools across the university.|Short Read
Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
Prof. Reetuparna Das

Sloan Fellowship for overcoming Moore’s Law in health and AI

To meet computing demand in a post Moore’s Law future, Das develops new architectures that improve performance by orders of magnitude.|Medium Read

Taking on the limits of computing power

By harnessing the power and speed of graphics processing units, a University of Michigan startup can dramatically accelerate gene sequencing, shortening tasks that took multiple days to a single hour. |Medium Read
Prof. Emily Mower Provost

Precision Health Award for measuring moods

The result will be new measurement methods to determine how moods are shaped by both the behavior of an individual and daily interactions over time|Short Read
Cassie, EECS Prof. Jessy Grizzle's new robot on North Campus. Photo: Joseph Xu

$20M gift supports international research partnership

Collaboration between leading research universities will generate robotics and precision health advancements.|Medium Read
Emily Mower Provost, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, speaks at the Ada Lovelace Opera: A Celebration of Women in Computing event. Photo: Joseph Xu

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

A Q&A with machine learning expert Emily Mower Provost.|Medium Read

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Genome sequencing could be as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.|Medium Read
Scientist in the lab

New class of antibiotics: nanobiotics

U-M researchers Nicholas Kotov and J. Scott VanEpps are collaborating to create a new class of antibiotics known as nanobiotics.|Short Read
Portrait of Jenna Weins

Precision health pioneer named to MIT Technology Review innovator list

The national magazine recognized Jenna Wiens as one of 2017's 35 Innovators Under 35.|Short Read