Imaging Technology

Magna Cum Laude Merit award for research to detect the progress of diseases such as multiple sclerosis

The researchers' imaging technique is fast, accurate, and reproducible|Medium Read
Myofibroblasts can be seen accumulating in the 3d lung connective tissue model even in soft conditions mimicking a healthy lung. Image is stained for cytoskeleton (blue), cell nuclei (yellow), and a marker for myofibroblast activation (alpha-smooth muscle actin, red). Credit: Baker Lab.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options. |Medium Read
Melissa Haskell

Melissa Haskell receives NIH Fellowship for research to improve brain imaging

ECE postdoc Melissa Haskell works on improving functional magnetic resonance imaging so we can better measure and understand brain activity. |Short Read
Post-implosion images of the plasma cylinders. On the left, plasma tentacles stretch out from the sides of the conventional, straight-column design. With the 14-tesla and 20-tesla twisted structures in the middle and right, respectively, the plasma tentacles are much shorter. This reflects more uniform compression by the magnetic field. Credit: Paul Campbell; Plasma, Pulsed Power and Microwave Lab; University of Michigan.

Twisting magnetic fields for extreme plasma compression

When magnetic walls are closing in, wily plasma slips out between magnetic field lines. A Michigan-led team pioneered a way to keep more plasma contained.|Medium Read
Graphic of a camera taking a photo of an object

A 3D camera for safer autonomy and advanced biomedical imaging

Researchers demonstrated the use of stacked, transparent graphene photodetectors combined with image processing algorithms to produce 3D images and range detection.|Medium Read
Dr. Bouman shows the first ever image of a black hole - a red/orange ring that's brighter on the bottom than the top

Katie Bouman wows U-M community with insiders look at the black hole imaging project

Speaking to a full house in Rackham, Dr. Katie Bouman - Michigan ECE alum - explained the history and science of the project that gave us the first ever photo of a black hole. |Medium Read
Various participants test out iGYM

Creating a place where kids of all abilities can play together

Prof. Hun-Seok Kim helped design iGYM, an augmented reality system that allows disabled and able-bodied people to play physical games together. |Medium Read

The new quantum spurs action by the Michigan Quantum Science & Technology Working Group

The new working group showcased Michigan’s strength in Quantum Science at a workshop attended by researchers throughout the University of Michigan. |Medium Read
A Kirigami lattice. Photo: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering

Kirigami can spin terahertz rays in real time to peer into biological tissue

The rays used by airport scanners might have a future in medical imaging.|Medium Read
Two images side by side of a motorcycle rider. On the right side version the rider is highlighted in green.

Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback

The frame in which a human marks out the boundaries of an object makes a huge difference in how well AI software can identify that object through the rest of the video.|Medium Read

Afshari group receives Best Invited Paper award at the 2019 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference

Terahertz and sub-terahertz imaging can provide superior results in some biomedical imaging, spectroscopy, and water saturation detection.|Short Read

U-M alum is key player in first-ever image of a black hole

EECS-ECE alum Dr. Katie Bouman has helped expand our knowledge of the universe in a big way by shining light on one of the darkest mysteries in the cosmos.|Medium Read