Extreme Weather

Tom Logan

Tom Logan wins American Association of Geographers student paper award

U-M IOE PhD candidate, Tom Logan, has won the 2019 American Associate of Geographers (AAG) J. X. Kasperson Student Paper Award from the Hazards, Risk, and Disasters section of AAG.|Short Read
Amazon basin

CYGNSS hurricane-tracking satellites reveal Amazon flooding

“These images got us excited about the potential for doing new land-applications science with the CYGNSS data..."|Short Read
Weather moving across the United States on January 29, 2019. Photo: Nasa

Polar vortex: U-M researchers explain impacts

Electric vehicles will have reduced range, and batteries won't charge as readily. But beyond the cold Midwest, more of the globe is experiencing record highs.|Medium Read
Hurricane Florence approaching the east coast. Photo courtesy of the NOAA

Hurricane Florence: U-M researchers forecast impacts

More than 2 million people could lose power, and flooding is the major concern for several reasons.|Medium Read
Artistic rendition of CYGNSS in orbit.

CYGNSS’ ocean achievements pave way for land applications

18 months after the satellites launched, researchers are still discovering new study opportunities.|Medium Read
A photo of three snow plows clearing a busy highway of snow

Bomb cyclone

On January 4th, 2018 a crazy weather event slammed into the Northeast United States coast. This phenomenon is known as a bomb cyclone.|Short Read
Navid Yazdi

Evigia founder Navid Yazdi creates essential sensor networks

Alumnus Navid Yazdi develops sensors that accomplish incredible tasks.|Medium Read

Predicting a hurricane’s impact with big data

A research team prepares weather models that will predict a storm’s impact on the electrical infrastructure. |Short Read

Hurricane Irma: Engineering researchers involved in forecasts and more

Michigan Engineering professors offer insights into the storm and discuss the ways in which they’re tracking it.|Medium Read
A river floods over a city street.

Atmospheric rivers

Michigan researchers have developed a series of animations to predict when atmospheric rivers will impact land, allowing for better preparation for extreme weather events. |Short Read
Illustration of CYGNSS

CYGNSS storm-tracking satellites release first data

Ready for hurricane season, which starts June 1.|Short Read
Portrait of Branko Kerkez

Kudos for smarter stormwater systems

Branko Kerkez’ article honored|Medium Read