Materials

More Materials News
In the image on the left, the light from the DNA molecules stuck to the surface is cancelled out, so the background fluorescence appears as a green haze. In the image on the right, the light form the DNA molecules is amplified.

New surface could streamline medical tests

Light waves have been harnessed to reveal molecules in blood and other samples in real time. It could change the way allergies are diagnosed and enable new discoveries in the life sciences.|Medium Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Kamal Sarabandi receives Stephen S. Attwood award

The Stephen S. Attwood award is the highest honor awarded to a faculty member by the College of Engineering. Prof. Sarabandi has shaped the field of radar remote sensing for more than twenty years.|Medium Read
anthony grbic

Prof. Anthony Grbic elected IEEE Fellow for contributions to the theory and design of electromagnetic metamaterials

Prof. Grbic specializes in the broad fields of electromagnetics and optics, with interests ranging from fundamental electromagnetic theory to microwave circuits. |Short Read

Heat radiates 10,000 times faster at the nanoscale

In a unique ultra-low vibration lab, engineers have, for the first time, measured how heat radiates from one surface to another in a vacuum at distances down to 2 nanometers.|Short Read
Materials Science & Engineering logo

New chemical process could lead to high-efficiency LEDs

University of Michigan researchers has developed a new process that can improve the efficiency of the of metal-free organic phosphors that could be the key to phosphorescent LEDs.|Short Read
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science logo

Layered graphene beats the heat

An international team of researchers, led by faculty at the University of Michigan, have found that a layered form of graphene can expel heat efficiently, which is an important feature for its potential applications in building small and powerful electronics.|Medium Read
Portrait of Jay Whitacre.

Michigan Engineering alum receives Lemelson-MIT Prize

U-M MSE alum, Jay Whitacre, is being recognized for his work inventing the Aqueous Hybrid Ion battery.|Short Read
Conductor is tested in a lab

Kirigami art could enable stretchable plasma screens

The art of paper cutting may slice through a roadblock on the way to flexible, stretchable electronics, a team of engineers and an artist at the University of Michigan has found.|Short Read
Glow in the dark liquid reads UMICH and Go Blue

‘Supercool’ material glows when you write on it

A new material developed at the University of Michigan stays liquid more than 200 degrees Fahrenheit below its expected freezing point, but a light touch can cause it to form yellow crystals that glow under ultraviolet light. |Short Read
Materials Science & Engineering logo

Liquid bonding a super plastic

A new 'super plastic' that can direct heat away from its source opens up a wide range of possibilities for making more efficient electronic devices.|Short Read
Materials Science & Engineering logo

Spintronics: Beyond Silicon

A groundbreaking new semiconductor compound may lead to smaller, faster, less power-hungry electronics.|Short Read

Beyond silicon: New semiconductor moves “spintronics” toward reality

A groundbreaking semiconductor compound is bringing fresh momentum to the field of spintronics, a new breed of computing device that may lead to smaller, faster, less power-hungry electronics.|Medium Read