Materials

Outlaw alloys

Metals that court chaos could be the future of computing.|Short Read
Aerospace Engineering logo

Ph.D. student Tim Brooks optimizes composite manufacturing to enable lighter aircraft

Aerospace doctoral student Tim Brooks has been implementing computational methods that are helping to make new optimized processes of composite manufacturing a reality, enabling lighter and more fuel-efficient aircraft. |Medium Read
Man pours liquid concrete into a small container

Roads and bridges would last longer, save money with new concrete formula

U-M researchers to offer non-proprietary concrete formula free of charge.|Medium Read

Kevlar-based artificial cartilage mimics the magic of the real thing

In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength.|Medium Read
A tube containing black powder is poured onto a flat surface

Turning waste heat into emissions-free electricity

Energy-intensive industries have been waiting for a low-cost, low-toxicity thermoelectric generation material. It’s here.|Medium Read

Materials at Michigan Symposium

Materials at Michigan is a special bicentennial year symposium to celebrate the impact of advanced materials research on society.|Short Read
Student works in the lab

Printed meds could reinvent pharmacies, drug research

A new process can print multiple medications onto a single dissolvable strip, microneedle patch or other surface.|Medium Read
Scientist in the lab

U-M researchers are collaborating to create a new class of antibiotics known as nanobiotics.

Nicholas Kotov and J. Scott VanEpps are collaborating to create a new class of antibiotics known as nanobiotics.|Short Read

Heat-conducting plastic could lead to lighter electronics, cars

Unfurling the long chains of molecules in plastics could help them dissipate heat more easily.|Medium Read

‘Magic’ alloy could spur the next generation of solar cells

A new alloy could reduce the cost of high-efficiency solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics."|Medium Read
Two droplets of water repelled by an ultra-durable water-repellent coating. The droplet on the left is sitting on a surface that has been abraded by a machine.

A self-healing, water-repellant coating that’s ultra durable

This coating developed at the University of Michigan is hundreds of times more durable than its counterparts and could enable waterproofing of vehicles, clothing, rooftops and countless other surfaces. |Medium Read
Gold nanoparticle assembly fades to ball-and-stick representation of structure

Most complex nanoparticle crystal ever made by design

Extraordinary nanoparticle crystals are possible by harnessing particle shape in addition to using DNA as smart glue.|Medium Read