Extreme Weather

More Extreme Weather News

Predicting a hurricane’s impact with big data

A research team prepares weather models that will predict a storm’s impact on the electrical infrastructure. |Short Read

Hurricane Irma: Engineering researchers involved in forecasts and more

Michigan Engineering professors offer insights into the storm and discuss the ways in which they’re tracking it.|Medium Read
A river floods over a city street.

Atmospheric rivers

Michigan researchers have developed a series of animations to predict when atmospheric rivers will impact land, allowing for better preparation for extreme weather events. |Short Read
Illustration of CYGNSS

CYGNSS storm-tracking satellites release first data

Ready for hurricane season, which starts June 1.|Short Read
Portrait of Branko Kerkez

Kudos for smarter stormwater systems

Branko Kerkez’ article honored|Medium Read
Artistic rendition of CYGNSS in orbit.

CYGNSS satellite constellation enters Science Operations phase

The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), a constellation of eight microsatellites that will take detailed measurement of hurricane windspeeds, has moved into its science operations phase.|Medium Read

U-M team’s power grid work earn kudos at national conference

Society for Risk Analysis recognizes Michigan researchers for work predicting storm damage.|Short Read
Visualization of a CYGNSS satellite

Hurricane tracking satellites successfully launched

NASA has successfully launched a constellation of eight hurricane-tracking microsatellites in a $151 million mission that’s led by the University of Michigan.|Medium Read
Researcher inspects CYGNSS

Hurricane-tracking satellite fleet readies for launch

Launch is fast approaching for a $151 million, University of Michigan-led NASA satellite mission that will help improve forecasts of hurricane track, intensity and storm surge.|Medium Read
A town destroyed by a natural disaster

$2.5M to launch a new era in ‘natural hazards engineering’

A $2.5 million project funded by the NSF will create a computational framework to define a set of standards for disaster researchers.|Medium Read
Model of power outages created by researchers at the University of Michigan, Ohio State University and Texas A&M University.

UPDATED: Hurricane Matthew could leave 9 million in the dark

According to the latest power outage forecasts hurricane Matthew could knock out power for 9.6 million people in the United States in a wide swath stretching from Miami to the Carolinas.|Short Read
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Large seawalls are effective at cutting tsunami deaths

Seawalls higher than approximately 16 feet can effectively reduce tsunami-related damage and death, according to a new study that applies big-data analytics to more than 200 years of tsunami records from the Pacific coast of Japan’s Tohoku region. |Medium Read