Analytics

Accepting that deadlines have a degree of uncertainty could be the key to more successful projects. Graphic: Shannon Riedel

How to hack your deadline: Admit it’s uncertain

Two simple steps can take the fear out of drop-dead dates. |Short Read
Cassie, EECS Prof. Jessy Grizzle's new robot on North Campus. Photo: Joseph Xu

$20M gift supports international research partnership

Collaboration between leading research universities will generate robotics and precision health advancements.|Medium Read
Ito, Michielssen, Guo, Lui, Chew

Solving impossible equations

Eric Michielssen has discovered a new way to rapidly analyze electromagnetic phenomena, and it’s catching on.|Medium Read

Benton Harbor partners with U-M researchers to bolster public transit

Surveys and electronic tracking will help boost transit efforts to connect residents with jobs.|Short Read

‘Sensors in a Shoebox’ empower citizens to gather data about communities

Civil engineering and education researchers are working together with Detroit teens.|Short Read

Predicting a hurricane’s impact with big data

A research team prepares weather models that will predict a storm’s impact on the electrical infrastructure. |Short Read
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Building the internet of water

Sensor nodes that measure the water flow, soil moisture, rainfall and other rapidly changing storm predictors.|Short Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

U-M cyber security startup purchased by FICO

Analytic software company FICO of San Jose, Calif., bought QuadMetrics to help in its development of a FICO Enterprise Security Score. |Medium Read
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Quadmetrics cyber security

For a variety of reasons companies have not been able to stay ahead of cyber criminals.|Short Read
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Find a parking place with your smartphone

Drivers may one day be able to find a parking space on their smartphones instead of hunting for one on the street.|Short Read
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How pollen might make clouds

Michigan engineers were able to see that when pollen breaks down it can indeed produce particles that are small enough to seed cloud growth. |Short Read