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SpecOp team poses for a team photo

SpecOp takes second in Venture Well’s BMEidea Competition, eyes next steps

When a class project wasn’t going to cut it in the market, the SpecOp team didn't give up.|Medium Read
Hospital equipment

Holes found in report on St. Jude medical device security

A report that alleged security flaws in a popular brand of pacemaker and other life-saving medical devices has major flaws of its own, Michigan Engineering researchers found.|Medium Read
Red laser light hits glass slide.

Turning blood into a laser emitter for drug testing, cancer treatment

University of Michigan researchers have successfully demonstrated a new technique that combines laser light with an FDA-approved fluorescent dye to monitor cell structure and activity at the molecular level. This could lead to improved clinical imaging and better monitoring of tumors and other cell structures. It could also be used during drug testing to monitor the changes that cells undergo when exposed to prospective new drugs.|Short Read
Prof. Emily Mower Provost

Collecting data to better identify bipolar disorder

Prof. Emily Mower Provost is collaborating to develop new technologies that provide individuals with insight into how the disease changes over time.|Short Read
Prof. David Chesney

David Chesney awarded funding to research treatment for traumatic brain injury

This device could not only be useful in the ICU or field hospital setting, but also during long military patient transport, and especially in situations in which limited personnel and resources are available.|Short Read
Team members outside Flint water plant

Google, U-M to build digital tools for Flint water crisis

A partnership between Google and the University of Michigan’s Flint and Ann Arbor campuses aims to provide a smartphone app and other digital tools to Flint residents and officials to help them manage the ongoing water crisis.|Medium Read
The device captures cancer cells from a blood sample.

Blood biopsy: Releasing cancer cells for better analysis

A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment. |Medium Read
Microscope photos of mouse lung cells

“Trojan horse” Nanoparticle can halt asthma, allergies

In an entirely new approach to treating asthma and allergies, a biodegradable nanoparticle acts like a Trojan horse, hiding an allergen in a friendly shell to convince the immune system not to attack it.|Short Read
Kevin Fu in suit and tie

Startup founded by U-M assoc. professor gets NSF grant

Healthcare security company Virta Laboratories, Inc. has received a $750,000 grant from the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.|Short Read
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science logo

New 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

The new design, under development at Michigan, should be smaller and able to achieve higher resolutions than current 3D cameras.|Medium Read
microelectrode array

Cutting the cost of hearing

MEMStim’s technology is already two phases into pre-clinical testing in preparation for FDA examination. Very few MEMS devices have made it this far.|Medium Read
Mottled grayscale images with squares of mottled color.

Virtual biopsy

A new imaging method uses infrared light to recover ultrasound images and chemical information from tissues inside the body - without breaking the skin.|Short Read