Energy

Guosong Zeng, a postdoctoral scholar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, at work testing the artificial photosynthesis device developed by Zetian Mi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan.

Artificial photosynthesis devices that improve themselves with use

'Our discovery is a real game-changer. I’ve never seen such stability.'|Medium Read
Simulation of a model scramjet operating at supersonic flight conditions, showing different physical processes within the engine.

$12.75M for reliable hypersonic engines and artificial photosynthesis

Two U-M led projects are funded by the Department of Defense.|Medium Read
An illustration of the egg crate electronic structure, shown between two mirrors so that the red laser light resonates. The polaritons, trapped in the pockets, are represented by the sum of their parts: a green exciton, with electron and hole shown inside, attached to a red lightwave. Even with just a few excitons in the wells, the energy required to add a new one begins to jump

“Egg carton” quantum dot array could lead to ultralow power devices

By putting a twist on new “2D” semiconductors, researchers have demonstrated their potential for using single photons to transmit information.|Medium Read
Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering logo

UM researchers awarded $3.9M for transformational energy technology

The University of Michigan announced today that it was awarded $3.9 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The funding will be used to harvest hydrokinetic energy using reconfigurable high-efficiency marine micro-turbines.|Short Read
Detroit city skyline

U-M, community partners tackle energy insecurity in three Detroit neighborhoods

Johanna Mathieu is one of four principal investigators on a project to improve home energy efficiency and to lower monthly utility bills.|Medium Read
the battery in a hand

Range-doubling lithium metal batteries ‘build themselves’ in lithium ion manufacturing machinery

Lithium metal solid-state batteries can provide a safer, more powerful alternative to the current standard.|Medium Read
Hercules laser

Coordination and collaboration are critical to U.S. leadership in plasma science: a Q&A with the Plasma 2020 Decadal Study co-chair

Plasma science has the potential to speed advances in medicine, energy, electronics and more—including helping us deal with pandemics.|Medium Read

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat

By reflecting nearly all the light they can’t turn into electricity, they help pave the way for storing renewable energy as heat.|Medium Read
Zetian Mi

U-M startup NS Nanotech unveils new generation of LEDs for high-efficiency, high-performance displays

Brighter, crisper screens that draw half the power and lasts twice as long are possible with NS Nanotech's next-gen LEDs.|Medium Read

Flexible wings, COVID-19, and the future of commercial aviation

At the June 2017 Paris Airshow, Airbus entered into a five-year agreement with the University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering department to establish and fund, to the tune of $8.25 million, a new research center. Called the Airbus-University of Michigan Center for Aero-Servo-Elasticity of Very Flexible Aircraft, its purpose is to engage in fundamental research, focusing on advanced methodologies for designing and evaluating future aircraft. We recently caught up with the Center's director, Dr. Carlos Cesnik, and asked him about the work being done there, the aircraft of the future, and the impact of the recent COVID-19 crisis on the aerospace industry.|Medium Read
Hot electrons travel along the molecule into the probe tip. The molecule only allows electrons within a narrow range of energies to pass.

First measurement of electron energy distributions

The new tool could enable the design of more efficient sustainable energy and chemistry technologies.|Medium Read
The experimental flow loop that will be used to emulate the cooling loop in a molten salt reactor

$5.2M for digital twins of nuclear reactors could bring down nuclear energy costs

Virtual copies of nuclear reactors could enable smarter maintenance for current reactors and more automation for advanced reactors.|Medium Read