Electronic Devices

A window into the future of solar power

Windows in the buildings of the future could double as efficient solar cells.|Medium Read

U-M researchers develop small device that bends light to generate new radiation

This device, the size of a match head, can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab.|Medium Read
Two photon quantum computing research graphic

It takes two photonic qubits to make quantum computing possible

Professors Ku and Steel are applying their expertise to take key next steps toward practical quantum computing|Medium Read
An earlier product of the Michigan Integrated Circuits Lab. Photo: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering

Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects

DARPA’s initiative to reinvigorate the microelectronics industry draws deeply on Michigan Engineering expertise.|Medium Read
Professors work on small chips

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

U-M team will serve as model for nimble and innovative system-on-chip design.|Medium Read
Old processor

Enabling anyone to design hardware with a new open-source tool

Six-month hardware design process will be turned into 24-hour automated task.|Medium Read
Hun-Seok Kim

Hun-Seok Kim receives DARPA Young Faculty Award to advance research in IoT networks

Kim’s research is expected to impact the future design and wireless operation of the next generation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices|Short Read

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.|Short Read
Magnified nanoparticles

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

With a bit of metal, nanoparticles shine in colors based on size.|Medium Read
An artistic rendering of a hexagonal atomic lattice structure with a spiral pulse of light coming from the top left and hitting the center of the lattice.

Light could make semiconductor computers a million times faster or even go quantum

Electron states in a semiconductor, set and changed with pulses of light, could be the 0 and 1 of future “lightwave” electronics or room-temperature quantum computers.|Medium Read
a photo of solar tech in the hands of a scientist

Organic solar cells reach record efficiency, benchmark for commercialization

The multi-layered organic solar cells will be able to curve in clothing or be transparently built into windows.|Medium Read
5 researchers work with computer sensors

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Powered by a broadband infrared laser, the device can zero in on the ‘spectral fingerprint region’.|Medium Read