Light Lasers and Optics

More Light Lasers and Optics News

Precise pulses explore light’s magnetism

A new laser will investigate an unusual magnetic effect that may lead to efficient solar energy harvesting.|Medium Read

Doubling the power of the world’s most intense laser

It could enable tabletop particle and X-ray sources as well as the investigation of astrophysics and quantum dynamics.|Medium Read
Zetian Mi

Zetian Mi elected OSA Fellow

Mi recognized for his work with full-color LEDs and more|Short Read
John Nees

John Nees elected OSA Fellow

Nees recognized for work with ultrafast lasers|Short Read
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science logo

Almantas Galvanauskas elected OSA Fellow

Galvanauskas recognized for his work with fiber lasers|Short Read

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.|Medium Read

Harnessing light to drive chemical reactions

The mechanism transferring light energy from capturer to catalyst is explained, paving the way to design better reactions that use less energy and produce less waste.|Medium Read
Laser focuses light through yogurt

Seeing through materials

By developing a fast algorithm to map out the paths light takes through yogurt, researchers aim to someday see through skin.|Medium Read
Audience

U-M Optics researchers sponsor Optics and Photonics Industry Snapshot

The Optics and Photonics event showed a thriving industry in SE Michigan|Short Read
Graphene chip

Graphene ‘phototransistor’ for imaging, communications

New light-detecting device senses light that doesn’t hit the graphene itself. |Medium Read
animation of semiconductor spiral

Twisted semiconductors for future moving holograms

Holographic displays need twisted light. Twisted semiconductors assembled with the help of amino acids may enable them.|Medium Read
Each pulse twists by 90 degrees.

Ultrashort light pulses for fast “lightwave” computers

Extremely short, configurable “femtosecond” pulses of light demonstrated by an international team could lead to future computers that run up to 100,000 times faster than today’s electronics.|Medium Read