Light Lasers and Optics

prof rand presenting

DYNAMO achieves first observation of the “charge separation effect”

Research led by Prof. Stephen Rand, Director of the Center for Dynamic Magneto-optics (DYNAMO), has important potential for energy conversion, ultrafast switching, nanophotonics, and nonlinear optics.|Medium Read
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors.|Medium Read
Two cargo trucks.

Nuclear nonproliferation: gamma-ray vision for ports and border crossings

The low-energy nuclear reaction could see through heavy containers hiding materials that could be turned into nuclear weapons. |Short Read
Hercules laser

Coordination and collaboration are critical to U.S. leadership in plasma science: a Q&A with the Plasma 2020 Decadal Study co-chair

Plasma science has the potential to speed advances in medicine, energy, electronics and more—including helping us deal with pandemics.|Medium Read
Blue and Green LEDs

Full-color nano-LEDs for better, longer lasting LED performance

Research led by Prof. Zetian Mi to advance LEDs for high-efficiency, high-performance displays is recognized with the Distinguished Paper Award from the Society for Information Display.|Short Read
Michigan Brain Probe next to dime

Research on neural probe that sheds multicolor light on the complexities of the brain recognized for its impact

Prof. Euisik Yoon and his team are recognized for their work designing low-noise, multisite/multicolor optoelectrodes that will help neurologists learn more about neural connectivity in the brain. |Short Read
Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective.|Medium Read
Hot electrons travel along the molecule into the probe tip. The molecule only allows electrons within a narrow range of energies to pass.

First measurement of electron energy distributions

The new tool could enable the design of more efficient sustainable energy and chemistry technologies.|Medium Read

PhD student Laura Andre is awarded Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship from SPIE

Andre was chosen for her outstanding research and commitment to outreach activities.|Short Read
A four-shank probe, with each prong just 0.07 millimeters across, next to a penny for scale.

Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers

It will now be possible to study brain activity when timing is important, such as the consolidation of memory.|Medium Read
Hebert Winful

Herbert Winful named Joseph E. and Anne P. Rowe Professor of Electrical Engineering

Winful has made fundamental contributions to nonlinear optics and the physics of tunneling, while also championing an inclusive department.|Long Read
Adrienne D. Stiff-Roberts

Alumna Prof. Adrienne Stiff-Roberts honored with the Willie Hobbs Moore Distinguished Lectureship

The Duke University Professor delivered a virtual talk on enabling hybrid thin films for optoelectronics and shared her memories of Michigan. |Medium Read