Health Care

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Human hand holding the everter device

Reconstructive surgery tech

Born in an engineering class, now the ‘arterial everter’ has been licensed to Baxter.|Medium Read
Newspaper

Emotions predicted by examining the correlation between tweets and environmental factors

External factors, ranging from weather, news exposure, social network emotion charge, timing, and mood predisposition may have a bearing on one's emotion level throughout the day.|Short Read

Electricity, eel-style: Soft power cells could run tomorrow’s implantables

Device generates over 100 volts from saltwater.|Short Read
Prof. Kevin Fu

Kevin Fu Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Embedded and Medical Device Security

Prof. Fu was named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2018, "for contributions to embedded and medical device security."|Medium Read

Artificial cartilage made from Kevlar mimics the magic of the real thing

In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength.|Medium Read

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

White blood cells get busy taking out the trash - it could be a lifesaver when the immune system goes haywire.|Short Read
nerve cells

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read
Student working in lab.

The Biointerfaces Institute at Michigan

The Biointerfaces Institute brings together researchers from dentistry, pharmacy, engineering and medical schools.|Short Read

Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance

An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.|Medium Read
Student works in the lab

Printed meds could reinvent pharmacies, drug research

A new process can print multiple medications onto a single dissolvable strip, microneedle patch or other surface.|Medium Read

“Labyrinth” chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells

A breast cancer clinical trial relies on a hydrodynamic maze to capture cancer stem cells from patient blood.|Short Read