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3D printed splint saves the life of a baby

“Quite a few doctors said he had a good chance of not leaving the hospital alive,” says April Gionfriddo, about her now 20-month-old son, Kaiba. “At that point, we were desperate. Anything that would work, we would take it and run with it.”|Medium Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

A new laser paradigm: An electrically injected polariton laser

"It is no longer a scientific curiosity. It's a real device."|Short Read
Debra George with Doctors without Borders

Debra George: Logistician, world-changer

Debra George compares her experience as a Michigan Engineering student to her time now in Chad Africa, working for Doctors Without Borders.|Medium Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

NAE awards Mona Jarrahi a Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grant

With the support of the Grainger Foundation, Jarrahi will explore genetic therapy methods to treat diseases.|Short Read
Dennis Sylvester

Prof. Dennis Sylvester receives U-M Faculty Recognition Award

He is a pioneer in the field of ultra-low power processor design, especially for the smallest computing devices in existence.|Short Read
Cockroach in lab

Cockroaches and Robots: Reverse engineering the balance systems of animals

These new insights could one day help engineers design steadier robots and improve doctors’ understanding of human gait abnormalities.|Medium Read
Shai Revzen

Translating animal movement into better robotic design

Revzen believes that his findings can be used to engineer better man-made devices, including prosthetic limbs and complete robots.|Short Read
sound wave graphic

Super-fine sound beam could one day be an invisible scalpel

"We believe this could be used as an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery," Guo said. "Nothing pokes into your body, just the ultrasound beam."|Short Read
nathan roberts

Nathan Roberts earns Best Paper Award for research to assist in remote patient monitoring

Roberts is helping to develop low-power sensor nodes that will be worn on the body to detect certain medical conditions.|Short Read
ct scan

New technology allows CT scans to be done with a fraction of the conventional radiation dose

“We’re excited to be adding Veo to the measures we already have in place to ensure that we get diagnostic images using the lowest amount of radiation possible."|Medium Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

New research program aims to make better “sense” of the world

Applications of this research range from soil sensors which allow for increased understanding of global climate change to futuristic sensory skins which can monitor the integrity of an object.|Medium Read
ambiq micro team

Powering breakthrough technologies

Ambiq Micro could revolutionize ubiquitous computing, with energy-efficient microcontrollers that are 10 times more energy efficient than conventional microprocessors.|Short Read