Health Care

Student team brings augmented reality to the operating room

With the help of a VR headset, three students helped a doctor stay focused in the operating room.|Medium Read
Heart rate monitor

Research responsible for establishing field of medical device security recognized by IEEE

Defibrillator security paper receives Test of Time Award from IEEE Security & Privacy|Medium Read

Student awarded NSF Fellowship for automating speech-based disease classification

Perez’s research focuses on analyzing speech patterns of patients with Huntington Disease.|Short Read
A doctor uses a stethoscope to examine another person

Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness

Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.|Medium Read
The wearable device measures roughly 2 x 2.75 x 1 inches, with the cancer-cell-capturing chip mounted on top. The catheter connecting to the patient runs through the hole in the top left corner. Illustration by Tae Hyun Kim, Nagrath Lab, University of Michigan.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.|Medium Read
David Chesney and wheelchair

David Chesney to receive 2018 James T. Neubacher Award

“His course really opened my eyes to the difficulties that some people have when using a universally designed product."|Medium Read

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

The papers provide data-driven solutions to hospital infection and the use of machine learning in healthcare.|Short Read
Emily Mower Provost, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, speaks at the Ada Lovelace Opera: A Celebration of Women in Computing event. Photo: Joseph Xu

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

A Q&A with machine learning expert Emily Mower Provost.|Medium Read

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Genome sequencing could be as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing.|Short Read
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Using data science to achieve ultra-low dose CT image reconstruction

Ultra-low dose CT scans that provide superior image quality could not only benefit patients, but they could open up entirely new clinical applications. |Short Read
Photo of U-M gymnast Emma McLean

Innovation on the mat

ME professor Ellen Arruda partnered with engineering technician Andrea Poli to create a custom heel cup for gymnast Emma McLean|Medium Read
Close-up of 3D bacteria

‘Nightmare bacteria:’ Michigan Engineers discuss how to combat antibiotic resistance

Drug-resistant bugs are on the rise and new approaches are needed.|Medium Read