Health and Environment

New biodegradable hydrogel offers eco-friendly alternative to synthetics

A water-absorbing hydrogel made from bacteria provides a safer soil solution.|Medium Read
Metal rods that are part of the molecular epitaxy beam apparatus at Michigan Engineering. Photo by Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks

More efficient LED lighting and invisibility cloaking are two possible applications for a new process that adds metallic nanoparticles to semiconductors.|Medium Read

Michigan Researchers developed a ladder simulator designed to test fatigue in climbers

Michigan researchers are leading an effort to determine whether or not the distance between ladder rungs is the reason for many workplace falls. |Short Read

‘Magic’ alloy could spur the next generation of solar cells

A new alloy could reduce the cost of high-efficiency solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics."|Medium Read
Water pouring from the tap.

Steps for Flint residents to reduce bacteria in filtered water

While filters reduce lead, they can harbor bacteria.|Medium Read
Michigan Engineering logo

Quantum limits to heat flow observed at room temperature

Quantum mechanics governs the flow of heat in atoms and Michigan Engineers have directly measured a "quantum of thermal conductance" at room temperature. |Medium Read
Two professors cut the ribbon to officially open the new restroom

New restrooms help demonstrate urine fertilizer concept

The nation's first end-to-end urine diversion demonstration system opened, a step toward more sustainable and cost-effective fertilizer and wastewater treatment.|Medium Read
Photo: Michigan Engineering

U-M research center spurs new approach to musculoskeletal health

The newly established Michigan Integrative Musculoskeletal Health Core Center is spearheading a research model that looks at bone, muscle and connective tissue as a single system instead of individual components.|Medium Read
Bill Magwood, Director-General at the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, speaks during a discussion panel at the Michigan Energy Symposium at the Rackham Graduate School

Will nuclear energy save us from climate change?

Energy-sector thought leaders, from industry, government and academia, recently came together at the University of Michigan to discuss the role of nuclear power in fighting climate change.|Medium Read
Man farming lettuce

A $3M grant to turn urine into food crop fertilizer

Converting human urine into a safe fertilizer for agricultural crops is the goal of a new $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation.|Medium Read
Scientist holds up two test tubes

A more accurate sensor for lead paint

A new molecular gel recipe developed at the University of Michigan is at the core of a prototype for a more accurate lead paint test.|Medium Read

One oil field a key culprit in global ethane gas increase

A single U.S. shale oil field is responsible for much of the past decade’s increase in global atmospheric levels of ethane, a gas that can damage air quality and impact climate.|Medium Read