Electronics + Devices

Photograph of the iGC3.c2 system.

Detecting environmental pollutants with a smaller, portable, fully electric gas chromatograph

Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani and Dr. Yutao Qin received an “Outstanding Paper Award” for their fully electronic micro gas chromatography system.|Short Read
Michael Hamel, NERS Ph.D. Student, uses a Microsoft Hololens headset with a radiation imaging array to demonstrate the use of augmented reality to find nuclear materials hidden in a room. Photo: Joseph Xu

The University of Michigan Extended Reality Initiative: Embracing the virtual future

U-M instructors like David Chesney are working to put next-gen interactive technology to use in the classroom and beyond.|Medium Read
a prototype GRIN

Harnessing ultrasonic waves to better monitor aging pipeline infrastructure

Phononics can address problems with signal attenuation.|Medium Read
Zetian Mi

U-M startup NS Nanotech unveils new generation of LEDs for high-efficiency, high-performance displays

Brighter, crisper screens that draw half the power and lasts twice as long are possible with NS Nanotech's next-gen LEDs.|Medium Read
Ester Bentley

Ester Bentley receives NDSEG Fellowship to help the world navigate without GPS

PhD student Ester Bentley designs smaller, better 3D mechanical resonators for use in high-performance gyroscopes to help unmanned systems navigate when GPS signal is jammed or lost. |Short Read
Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective.|Medium Read
Trevor Odelberg

Trevor Odelberg receives NDSEG Fellowship to help run the world with low power batteryless circuits

PhD student Trevor Odelberg’s low power circuits help us make sense of our environment while reducing battery waste. |Short Read
ADA zoom image

ADA Center holds 2020 symposium with virtual attendance, highlighting new research into computer design

The symposium highlighted new developments in computer architecture, and included a session on how the center's research can contribute to limiting the impact of pandemics.|Short Read
An Everactive sensor attached to a pipe. Photo by Evan Dougherty

Battery-free sensor startup takes aim at industrial efficiency

Part of the team that brought us the world’s smallest computer in 2015 brings the future of computing technology into the present. |Medium Read
A four-shank probe, with each prong just 0.07 millimeters across, next to a penny for scale.

Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers

It will now be possible to study brain activity when timing is important, such as the consolidation of memory.|Medium Read
Mobile phones around cell tower Isolated on digital background, mobile transmitter, Internet Communication Concept. 3d rendered

“Ultra low-power receivers for IoT applications” wins Outstanding Invited Paper

Prof. David Wentzloff’s paper examining the trends and techniques to achieve ultra-low power receivers was honored by the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference|Short Read
holding the new device

Lab-on-a-chip COVID-19 antibody test could offer rapid, accurate results

'Anyone working on COVID-19 antibody tests can use their reagents in our device'|Medium Read