mse lead

Ashwin Shahani and Saman Moniri work in the lab

How an age-old process could lead to new materials and even invisibility

A Q&A with Ashwin Shahani, U-M assistant professor of materials science and engineering |Medium Read
Powder about to be prepared

Post-silicon computing gets one step closer

Tunable semiconductor could lead to faster, more efficient computers|Medium Read
Mollusks

Cracking the mystery of nature’s toughest material

How mollusks engineered the most advanced nanostructure on Earth |Medium Read
Eyke holds the kirigami in hand

Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training

Low-cost sensors could one day enable patients to log exercise and track progress in a smartphone app|Medium Read
Two iterations of a metal lattice meet at a “grain boundary” defect, with atoms of an alloying element fitting into the defect. Illustration by Liang Qi, Computational Materials Science Group, University of Michigan

Hard as ceramic, tough as steel

Newly discovered connection could help with designing nextgen alloys.|Medium Read
Researchers in the lab with a large device

The “Magic Ratio” that could power tomorrow’s solar cells

A Q&A with Rachel Goldman|Medium Read
The morning sun rises on the Grove at North Campus of the University of Michigan.

University of Michigan launches Michigan Materials Research institute

Center to unite disciplines, spur new collaborations with government and industry|Medium Read
Juan Lopez wears sunglasses to protect his eyes in the lab

Immortal switches, quantum computers could stem from new semiconductor

Material’s polarity, conductivity change with temperature|Medium Read
Researcher wearing blue gloves works in the lab

Cancer is smarter than you think: Q&A with Geeta Mehta

Decoding the sophisticated inner workings of cancer may help us fight it.|Medium Read
Abhishek Dhyani works in the lab

Ice-proofing big structures with a “beautiful demonstration of mechanics”

'You're missing a trick,' mechanical engineer tells materials scientist.|Medium Read
Materials science and engineering professor and department chair Amit Misra. Photo: Joseph Xu

Amit Misra named AAAS fellow

Misra honored following research that has the potential to improve materials used in nuclear power reactors, automotive, aerospace and other structural applications.|Short Read
A transparent aerogel could reduce the energy loss in absorbers for solar thermal power plants by 67 percent. Credit: Lenert Lab, Michigan Engineering

$1.6M for solar cell windows and high-temperature solar power

New sustainability research garners support from Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technologies Office. |Medium Read