home research 2

Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed technology to provide contactless measurements of respiratory rate, heart rate and heart rate variability, which together are important indicators of an individual’s overall health.

Touchless respiratory and heart rate measurement for COVID-19 health screening

New technology provides a contactless method to add respiratory rate and heart rate to temperature readings .|Medium Read
A closer look at two catalyst reactions

Chemistry and energy: Machine learning to understand catalyst interactions

Toward harnessing machine learning to design the materials we want.|Medium Read
Hercules laser

Coordination and collaboration are critical to U.S. leadership in plasma science: a Q&A with the Plasma 2020 Decadal Study co-chair

Plasma science has the potential to speed advances in medicine, energy, electronics and more—including helping us deal with pandemics.|Medium Read
Ironpatch logo

$1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers

Ironpatch could head off growing danger of security vulnerabilities in vehicle systems.|Medium Read

A new look at an inevitable problem: muscle loss in aging

Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in muscle stem cells.|Medium Read

The science behind campus bus changes during COVID-19

Engineers used smoke machines, physics-based modeling and route optimization algorithms to quantify risk.|Medium Read
a prototype GRIN

Harnessing ultrasonic waves to better monitor aging pipeline infrastructure

Phononics can address problems with signal attenuation.|Medium Read
Zetian Mi

U-M startup NS Nanotech unveils new generation of LEDs for high-efficiency, high-performance displays

Brighter, crisper screens that draw half the power and lasts twice as long are possible with NS Nanotech's next-gen LEDs.|Medium Read
Post-implosion images of the plasma cylinders. On the left, plasma tentacles stretch out from the sides of the conventional, straight-column design. With the 14-tesla and 20-tesla twisted structures in the middle and right, respectively, the plasma tentacles are much shorter. This reflects more uniform compression by the magnetic field. Credit: Paul Campbell; Plasma, Pulsed Power and Microwave Lab; University of Michigan.

Twisting magnetic fields for extreme plasma compression

When magnetic walls are closing in, wily plasma slips out between magnetic field lines. A Michigan-led team pioneered a way to keep more plasma contained.|Medium Read
The prototype of a wirelessly powered, RFID-based sensor.

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”|Medium Read
detroit skyline

Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.|Medium Read
Ying’s algorithm reconstructs the spread of an entity such as an illness from single or multiple sources.

Tracking COVID-19 spread faster, and more accurately

A new application for an ongoing NSF project could bolster contract tracing efforts.|Medium Read