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Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
Screenshot of traffic intersection

Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform

Voxel51 uses AI processing to identify and track objects and activities through video clips.|Medium Read
Researcher wearing blue gloves works in the lab

Cancer is smarter than you think: Q&A with Geeta Mehta

Decoding the sophisticated inner workings of cancer may help us fight it.|Medium Read
A new microfluidic chip designed to catch circulating tumor cells

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment. |Medium Read
An electron microscope image

U-M receives $6.25M to study heat-to-electricity conversion and cooling with LEDs

Michigan Engineering is leading four other universities in Department of Defense-funded research.|Medium Read
Accepting that deadlines have a degree of uncertainty could be the key to more successful projects. Graphic: Shannon Riedel

How to hack your deadline: Admit it’s uncertain

Two simple steps can take the fear out of drop-dead dates. |Short Read
Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Herek Clack (left) talks to Zijie Lin, CEE student

Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses, study shows

Combining virus deactivation and filtration is highly effective against contaminated air.|Medium Read
Man stepping over puddle in rain

Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement

Data gleaned from cameras and sensors increases predictive accuracy.|Medium Read

How air conditioners could advance a renewable power grid

In an approach that won’t disrupt consumers, researchers will tackle two of the biggest issues in the energy industry.|Medium Read
Two stacked rings made from pairs of oppositely “supercharged” green fluorescent proteins (GFPs). Colors correspond to the actual fluorescence wavelength of the GFP molecules; the ribbons are derived from the structural model validated by observing cryogenically frozen proteins with an electron microscope. Image: Jens Glaser, Glotzer Group, Michigan Engineering, and Yi Zhou, UT Austin Department of Molecular Biosciences (background).

Toward protein nanomachines: just add charge

Added electrical charges can harness a protein’s shape and chemical properties to build interesting structures.|Medium Read
An artistic rendering of a synapse. Photo: Getty images

Toward brain-like computing: New memristor better mimics synapses

Competition and cooperation, which regulate the strengthening and weakening of connections in the brain, can now be modeled directly.|Medium Read
Model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Credit: Getty Images

A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

A U-M-led team of researchers developed the first atomic-level simulation that produced a mysterious defect.|Medium Read