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an example of the erasing message

Burn after reading

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech.|Medium Read

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat

By reflecting nearly all the light they can’t turn into electricity, they help pave the way for storing renewable energy as heat.|Medium Read
Robot with structural batteries

Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells

The researchers compare them to fat deposits in living creatures.|Medium Read
An N95 mask testing device

All masks are not created equal

Michigan Engineers test to evaluate safety.|Short Read
New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective.|Medium Read
The HEAT camera

Turning faces into thermostats

An autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy.|Medium Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read
REV-1 delivery robot

Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID

U-M startup says robotic food deliveries have quadrupled.|Medium Read
A four-shank probe, with each prong just 0.07 millimeters across, next to a penny for scale.

Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers

It will now be possible to study brain activity when timing is important, such as the consolidation of memory.|Medium Read
researcher spraying mask

Engineers work to disinfect N95 masks for medical personnel

Virus removal approaches, mask resilience and mask fit are all being tested.|Medium Read
sunrise approaching the sun

‘Largest radio telescope in space’ to improve solar storm warnings

NASA has selected University of Michigan’s $62M Explorer cubesat mission.|Medium Read