home lead 2

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat

By reflecting nearly all the light they can’t turn into electricity, they help pave the way for storing renewable energy as heat.|Medium Read
Myofibroblasts can be seen accumulating in the 3d lung connective tissue model even in soft conditions mimicking a healthy lung. Image is stained for cytoskeleton (blue), cell nuclei (yellow), and a marker for myofibroblast activation (alpha-smooth muscle actin, red). Credit: Baker Lab.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options. |Medium Read
Holding a sample of the solar cell

Urban solar energy: Solar panels for windows hit record 8% efficiency

Transparent solar panels on windows could take a bite out of a building’s electricity needs.|Medium Read
Jar of water glows with green light

Treating PFAS water contamination with cold plasma

University of Michigan researchers are developing better plasma technology that can destroy PFAS compounds|Medium Read
A simulation of the landing .

Sticking the landing on Mars: High-powered computing aims to reduce guesswork

As the Mars 2020 launch approaches, a separate effort is using simulations to understand landing dynamics for tomorrow's missions.|Medium Read
A stock image depicting coronavirus testing

How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.|Medium Read
Chad Jenkins, CSE Associate Professor, poses with his research group's two robots, Odd Job and Cookie, in the Beyster Building on October 27, 2016

Technology that serves all: a single step could pave the way

A Q&A with Chad Jenkins.|Medium Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
hand places ballot in box

New remote voting risks and solutions identified

The upcoming presidential election in the middle of a pandemic has many jurisdictions exploring new technologies. They're not secure. |Medium Read
Shilva Shrestha, Environmental Engineering PhD Student, has her temperature checked by Bryan Daniels, DPSS Quartermaster, at the entrance the G.G. Brown Building on North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI on May 26, 2020.

Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

'Noncritical' in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.|Medium Read
The public-facing dashboard uses a color-coded map of the state with breakdowns by region and county.

Web app, dashboard from U-M to inform Michiganders’ return to work

The web tools will help state officials identify potential hotspots as they reopen Michigan to business.|Medium Read
Parker Solar Probe approaching the sun

Switchbacks and spikes: Parker Solar Probe data consistent with 20-year-old theory

Magnetic flux findings suggest "profound consequences for basic solar processes."|Medium Read