health lead

a doctor giving an eye exam

For necessary eye exams, a new breath shield protects patients and doctors

Close proximity eye exams will need to continue during lockdown, calling for increased safety.|Medium Read
Artist rendering of COVID-19

U-M spinoff offers free coronavirus test kits to researchers

The kits help researchers understand where the virus came from and how it operates.|Medium Read
A man stacks cubes using a prosthetic arm

‘It’s like you have a hand again’

An ultra-precise mind-controlled prosthetic|Medium Read
Tejas Navaratna in the lab

Cancer: Faster screening to hit “undruggable” targets

Coiled proteins could stop cancer and other diseases from overriding signals within cells. |Medium Read
Sriram works at his computer

How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

A new method could replace trial and error drug development|Medium Read
Artistic render of cells in the body

Implantable cancer traps could provide earlier diagnosis and help monitor treatment

Synthetic scaffolding could detect multiple types of cancers before they start to spread.|Medium Read
Fibronectin network with cells.

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

While previous structures guessed at the environment that cells would want, the new design lets the cells build to their own specifications.|Medium Read
Scientists in a lab

U-M team to build synthetic neurons – first challenge in making synthetic cells

Seven U.S. research institutions look to build synthetic cells|Medium Read
Biomedical Engineering graduate student research assistant Menglian Zhou, adjusts the lung monitoring device.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.|Medium Read
Three athletes on the soccer field battle for control of the ball

Overuse, or one bad move? New view on ACL tears prompt questions on how athletes train

New research suggests a reevaluation of the way athletes train and prepare for competition.|Medium Read
Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
A Kirigami lattice. Photo: Joseph Xu/Michigan Engineering

Kirigami can spin terahertz rays in real time to peer into biological tissue

The rays used by airport scanners might have a future in medical imaging.|Medium Read