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How a COVID-19 app built at U-Michigan is helping businesses stay open

New real-time employer dashboards provide "live-feed of data" as employees report their symptoms while also safeguarding users' data privacy.|Medium Read
Myofibroblasts can be seen accumulating in the 3d lung connective tissue model even in soft conditions mimicking a healthy lung. Image is stained for cytoskeleton (blue), cell nuclei (yellow), and a marker for myofibroblast activation (alpha-smooth muscle actin, red). Credit: Baker Lab.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options. |Medium Read
A stock image depicting coronavirus testing

How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.|Medium Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read
Medical ventilators in a hospital

Faster than COVID: a computer model that predicts the disease’s next move

Predictive model could help care providers stay safe, anticipate patient needs.|Medium Read
holding the new device

Lab-on-a-chip COVID-19 antibody test could offer rapid, accurate results

'Anyone working on COVID-19 antibody tests can use their reagents in our device'|Medium Read
nonthermal plasma

Plasma jet wands could rapidly decontaminate hospital rooms

Room-temperature plasma beams could essentially dissolve away bacteria and viruses.|Medium Read
A homemade ventilator that utilizes a blood pressure sleeve

Grad student’s ventilator design sparks conversations with doctors and engineers

Affordable proof-of-concept device automates the manual squeezing required by bag valve masks.|Medium Read
Kevin Ward wearing the new helmet

Repurposed industrial respirator could free ventilators for COVID-19 patients

University of Michigan researchers have developed a helmet solution to support patients, protect health care workers and safeguard hospital systems.|Medium Read
N95 protective mask

Guidance on decontaminating face masks: U-M researchers contribute to national effort

Collaborative website launched while U-M researchers continue advanced testing.|Medium Read
Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Herek Clack (left) talks to Zijie Lin, CEE student

Non-thermal plasma can inactivate airborne viral threat to pigs

Performance is a step toward protection from viruses that infect humans|Medium Read
Eyke holds the kirigami in hand

Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training

Low-cost sensors could one day enable patients to log exercise and track progress in a smartphone app|Medium Read