eecs-ece lead

Guosong Zeng, a postdoctoral scholar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, at work testing the artificial photosynthesis device developed by Zetian Mi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan.

Artificial photosynthesis devices that improve themselves with use

'Our discovery is a real game-changer. I’ve never seen such stability.'|Medium Read
An illustration of the egg crate electronic structure, shown between two mirrors so that the red laser light resonates. The polaritons, trapped in the pockets, are represented by the sum of their parts: a green exciton, with electron and hole shown inside, attached to a red lightwave. Even with just a few excitons in the wells, the energy required to add a new one begins to jump

“Egg carton” quantum dot array could lead to ultralow power devices

By putting a twist on new “2D” semiconductors, researchers have demonstrated their potential for using single photons to transmit information.|Medium Read
robot pointing to set of scales of justice

Fairer AI for long-term equity

Prof. Mingyan Liu is a key member of a project to mitigate bias in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning systems for long-term equitable outcomes.|Medium Read
A student holding a MiTEE cubeset

Pioneering a way to keep very small satellites in orbit

More than 250 students had a hand in a satellite scheduled to launch on January 17th, the first in space for a project to keep nanosats in orbit by harnessing Earth’s magnetic field. |Medium Read
prof rand presenting

DYNAMO achieves first observation of the “charge separation effect”

Research led by Prof. Stephen Rand, Director of the Center for Dynamic Magneto-optics (DYNAMO), has important potential for energy conversion, ultrafast switching, nanophotonics, and nonlinear optics.|Medium Read
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors.|Medium Read
Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed technology to provide contactless measurements of respiratory rate, heart rate and heart rate variability, which together are important indicators of an individual’s overall health.

Touchless respiratory and heart rate measurement for COVID-19 health screening

New technology provides a contactless method to add respiratory rate and heart rate to temperature readings .|Medium Read
a cluster of monarch butterflies gather on a tree branch in the sun.

Tracking Monarch Butterfly Migration with the World’s Smallest Computer

In a project funded by National Geographic, ECE researchers are teaming up with the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to advance our understanding of monarch butterfly migration with the most ambitious iteration of the Michigan Micro Mote yet.|Medium Read
Hercules laser

Coordination and collaboration are critical to U.S. leadership in plasma science: a Q&A with the Plasma 2020 Decadal Study co-chair

Plasma science has the potential to speed advances in medicine, energy, electronics and more—including helping us deal with pandemics.|Medium Read
Holding a sample of the solar cell

Urban solar energy: Solar panels for windows hit record 8% efficiency

Transparent solar panels on windows could take a bite out of a building’s electricity needs.|Medium Read
A robotic, prosthetic leg

Space motor helps make robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable and extends battery life

Getting rid of some gears enabled a free-swinging knee, regenerative braking and brought the noise level down from vacuum cleaner to fridge.|Short Read
Jay Guo holds a sheet of flexible transparent conductor on the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering North Campus. The material sandwiches a thin layer of silver between two “dielectric” materials, aluminum oxide and zinc oxide, producing a conductive anti-reflection coating on the sheet of plastic.

Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity

Michigan Engineers change the game by making a conductive coating that’s also anti-reflective.|Medium Read