data computing lead

More data computing lead News
Colony of bacteria in culture medium plate. Getty Images

A ‘decathlon’ for antibiotics puts them through more realistic testing

Surprise findings could upend the current drug discovery approach for treating one of the most dangerous hospital-borne infections.|Medium Read
An artistic rendering of a synapse. Photo: Getty images

Toward brain-like computing: New memristor better mimics synapses

Competition and cooperation, which regulate the strengthening and weakening of connections in the brain, can now be modeled directly.|Medium Read
Sound wave visualization. Getty Images.

Mining soundwaves: Researchers unlock new data in sonar signals

“Acoustic fields are unexpectedly richer in information than is typically thought.”|Medium Read
An oil refinery at night.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring|Medium Read
Cassie, EECS Prof. Jessy Grizzle's new robot on North Campus. Photo: Joseph Xu

$20M gift supports international research partnership

Collaboration between leading research universities will generate robotics and precision health advancements.|Medium Read
Emily Mower Provost, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, speaks at the Ada Lovelace Opera: A Celebration of Women in Computing event. Photo: Joseph Xu

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

A Q&A with machine learning expert Emily Mower Provost.|Medium Read
A close up of a computer chip

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

Patches can provide protection.|Medium Read
The memristor array situated on a circuit board.

Memory-processing unit (MPU) could bring memristors to the masses

AI, weather forecasting and data science would all benefit from computers that store and process data in the same place. Memristors could be up to the task.|Medium Read

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.|Short Read
An artistic rendering of a hexagonal atomic lattice structure with a spiral pulse of light coming from the top left and hitting the center of the lattice.

Light could make semiconductor computers a million times faster or even go quantum

Electron states in a semiconductor, set and changed with pulses of light, could be the 0 and 1 of future “lightwave” electronics or room-temperature quantum computers.|Medium Read
Abstract lines connecting in space

$6.25M MURI project will decode world’s most complex networks

New tools could fight crime, protect financial system|Medium Read
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seated at a table

Zuckerberg Capitol Hill testimony: Engineering experts offer comments

U-M profs weigh new business model, European-style regulation|Short Read