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James O. Wilkes

In Memoriam: James O. Wilkes

Long-time professor and mentor, department chair, assistant dean, and department historian passed away following heart surgery |Long Read
the particule making process

Nanomedicine crosses into brain, eradicates recurring brain cancer in mice

The new approach helped seven out of eight mice fight off glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of adult brain cancer. |Medium Read
Image of Scott Fogler

Scott Fogler honored as Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year

Award recognizes Fogler’s outstanding contributions to undergraduate education|Medium Read
images of Andrew Allman and Xiwen Gong

Welcome to our new ChE Faculty

The department will welcome two new assistant professors this year, Andrew Allman and Xiwen Gong; Allman will join the faculty in September 2020 and Gong in January 2021|Short Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
image of Susan Montgomery

Dr. Susan Montgomery retires from Chemical Engineering after 27 years

Montgomery transitions to a three-year period of phased retirement during which she will serve the College of Engineering as an academic coach|Short Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read
a close up shot of a leaf showing its fractal pattern

Containment efforts appear to step down the spread of COVID-19 from the exponential norm

Deaths in China reflect a slower expansion of the new coronavirus, suggesting a fractal network.|Medium Read
Artist rendering of COVID-19

U-M spinoff offers free coronavirus test kits to researchers

The kits help researchers understand where the virus came from and how it operates.|Medium Read
mcubed image

Mcubed Communities launched this week

Program can strengthen institutional strategy, coordination and readiness. Mark Burns is the Executive Director of MCubed.|Short Read
Tejas Navaratna in the lab

Cancer: Faster screening to hit “undruggable” targets

Coiled proteins could stop cancer and other diseases from overriding signals within cells. |Medium Read
Professor Scott Fogler and 2019-2020 AIChE Officers

Chemical Engineering at 2019 AIChE Meeting

The student chapter and the chapter's advisor, H. Scott Fogler, received recognition at the 2019 AIChE Student Conference.|Short Read