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Myofibroblasts can be seen accumulating in the 3d lung connective tissue model even in soft conditions mimicking a healthy lung. Image is stained for cytoskeleton (blue), cell nuclei (yellow), and a marker for myofibroblast activation (alpha-smooth muscle actin, red). Credit: Baker Lab.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options. |Medium Read
New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
Sriram works at his computer

How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

A new method could replace trial and error drug development|Medium Read
Artistic render of cells in the body

Implantable cancer traps could provide earlier diagnosis and help monitor treatment

Synthetic scaffolding could detect multiple types of cancers before they start to spread.|Medium Read
An overhead 3D rendering of the planned design space renovation.

Regents approve first floor renovations in Biomedical Engineering building

New space will support experiential learning and collaboration opportunities for students.|Medium Read
Fibronectin network with cells.

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

While previous structures guessed at the environment that cells would want, the new design lets the cells build to their own specifications.|Medium Read
Biomedical Engineering graduate student research assistant Menglian Zhou, adjusts the lung monitoring device.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.|Medium Read
Three athletes on the soccer field battle for control of the ball

Overuse, or one bad move? New view on ACL tears prompt questions on how athletes train

New research suggests a reevaluation of the way athletes train and prepare for competition.|Medium Read
Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read
Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies.|Short Read
Colony of bacteria in culture medium plate. Getty Images

A ‘decathlon’ for antibiotics puts them through more realistic testing

Surprise findings could upend the current drug discovery approach for treating one of the most dangerous hospital-borne infections.|Medium Read