bme featured

A new look at an inevitable problem: muscle loss in aging

Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in muscle stem cells.|Medium Read
Inspecting the injectable bone graft.

Injectable ‘bone spackling’: A cell therapy approach to heal complex fractures

A Q&A with biomedical engineering professor Jan Stegemann, whose work in mice shows the promise of ‘microtissues.’|Medium Read
A doctor uses a stethoscope to examine another person

Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness

Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.|Medium Read
A runner kneels down to prepare to begin the race

Has the Olympics changed how it measures false-starts in track?

A Q&A with a biomechanics expert who has researched reaction times|Medium Read
Concentrated surgeon performing surgery with her team

No sponge left behind: tags for surgical equipment

A simple, easy-to-implement technology could prevent the debilitating injuries that can occur when organs are damaged by surgical tools left in the body.|Medium Read

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

White blood cells get busy taking out the trash - it could be a lifesaver when the immune system goes haywire.|Short Read
nerve cells

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance

An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.|Medium Read

Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center

Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.|Medium Read

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

A nanoparticle-assisted optical imaging technique could one day read the chemical makeup of a tumor.|Medium Read

Tiny device offers insight into how cancer spreads

Researchers have developed a fluidic device to track over time which cancer cells lead the disease’s invasive march.|Medium Read