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boyd

Student Spotlight: Christopher Boyd – From robotics to MEMS inertial sensors

Chris develops and tests control systems for MEMS inertial sensors, which are used to detect acceleration, tilt, and other attributes related to motion sensing.|Medium Read
mai le

Student Spotlight: Mai Le – Finding a better way to diagnose breast cancer with MRI

The research group is using statistical signal processing to create crisper images with only 20% of the data required by a traditional MRI scan. |Short Read
david hong

David Hong awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Hong intends to apply machine learning and signal processing techniques to the massive data sets now available to researchers.|Short Read
Materials Science & Engineering logo

Nanowires for greener LEDs

Shrinking semiconductors down to wires a few atoms across could lead to efficient, color-adjustable LED lights, according to work led by Manos Kioupakis of materials science and engineering.|Medium Read
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science logo

2013-14 Undergraduate Student Awards

Congratulations to these phenomenal students!|Short Read
nathan roberts

Student Spotlight: Nathan Roberts – Enabling the Internet of Things

Instead of a battery, the chip Nathan is engineering uses two solar cells that look like they belong on a calculator. |Short Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

2014 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Students

These students received the award based on their participation in research, leadership, and academic performance.|Short Read
seungku lee

Investigating a new material to help you stay connected

His final goal is to build novel RF circuits including frequency-selective switched oscillators based on his models.|Short Read
girish kulkarni

Paradigm shifting research advances in sensor technology

Girish’s research has resulted in a new paradigm in sensor technology that promises both high-speed and highly-sensitive detection.|Short Read
Aerospace Engineering logo

New hypersonic lab on the way

“Scramjet” technology, the focus of the research to be conducted in the lab, could underpin reusable space rockets, drones that could launch from the US and reach any location on the planet in under three hours, and perhaps even a 3-hour flight from New York to Tokyo.|Medium Read
graphene light detector

New tech could lead to night vision contact lenses

The detector developed by University of Michigan engineering researchers doesn't need bulky cooling equipment to work.|Medium Read
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science logo

Thermal vision: Graphene spans infrared spectrum

The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens.|Medium Read