Energy & Environment

featured Energy & Environment stories

Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cells

Buildings, clothing could generate power.|Medium Read
image of leaves

Learning from leaves

Heather Mayes is harnessing autumn’s hidden processes to improve renewable energy and even healthcare.|Short Read
A tube containing black powder is poured onto a flat surface

Turning waste heat into emissions-free electricity

Energy-intensive industries have been waiting for a low-cost, low-toxicity thermoelectric generation material. It’s here.|Medium Read

Precise pulses explore light’s magnetism

A new laser will investigate an unusual magnetic effect that may lead to efficient solar energy harvesting.|Medium Read
A man uses his phone to remotely control water valves

Floodproofing cities: $1.8M for smart stormwater project

Arming infrastructure with smart tech could limit flood damage.|Medium Read

Predicting a hurricane’s impact with big data

A research team prepares weather models that will predict a storm’s impact on the electrical infrastructure. |Short Read
Man speaks in front of class

Electric field control of magnetism

The Van Vlack Lecture Series was established in honor of L. H. Van Vlack, to provide a distinguished lecture series from the outstanding leaders in the field of Materials Science and Engineering.|Short Read
Researchers gather data

Using University of Michigan buildings as batteries

How a building's thermal energy can help the power grid accommodate more renewable energy sources.|Medium Read

Hurricane Irma: Engineering researchers involved in forecasts and more

Michigan Engineering professors offer insights into the storm and discuss the ways in which they’re tracking it.|Medium Read
A river floods over a city street.

Atmospheric rivers

Michigan researchers have developed a series of animations to predict when atmospheric rivers will impact land, allowing for better preparation for extreme weather events. |Short Read

Affordable lead sensor for home, city water lines

Citizens could become water quality watchdogs and monitor lead contamination at their own taps with new electronic sensors.|Medium Read
Metal rods that are part of the molecular epitaxy beam apparatus at Michigan Engineering. Photo by Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks

More efficient LED lighting and invisibility cloaking are two possible applications for a new process that adds metallic nanoparticles to semiconductors.|Medium Read