Data & Computing

More Data & Computing News
A map shows U.S. air traffic patterns.

How big data could reduce weather-related flight delays

Next year’s travelers may see fewer delays thanks to research now being conducted by a team of University of Michigan engineers.|Short Read

How big data could reduce flight delays

Data from the project may be used to build computer modeling software that could predict the outcome of an infinite number of hypothetical flight and weather scenarios, helping airlines spot likely weather delays in advance.|Short Read
IBM watson

Students to use IBM Watson Cognitive Computing System in class

Michigan is one of seven universities IBM is partnering with to give students access to the technology. |Short Read
luis gomez

Student Spotlight: Luis Gomez – An expert in computational electromagnetics and teaching

The goal of Gomez's research is to alleviate the communications blackout that sometimes occurs when vehicles are traveling through the earth’s atmosphere.|Short Read
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Powering the internet of things

Imagine a gym shirt that tells an app your body temp and heart rate, or could alert you before an asthma attack happens.|Short Read
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Thank Lynn Conway for your cell phone

She’s been called the “hidden hand” in the 1980s microchip design revolution that made today’s personal computers and smartphones possible.|Medium Read
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What are quantum computers going to do for us?

Michigan Engineering professor Duncan Steel explains how quantum computing works, using quantum bits that take on superpositions of 0 and 1 simultaneously.|Short Read
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Tackling turbulence with big data

A thorny aerodynamics problem is about to get a Netflix-style “big data” treatment from a Michigan-led team of engineers.|Medium Read
Pin-Yu Chen

Pin-Yu Chen receives Rackham Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship

Chen's work can be used in community detection in social networks, network vulnerability assessment in communication systems, and more.|Short Read
Mr. Mollenkopf

Steve Mollenkopf: What it takes to lead in technology

Steve Mollenkopf is the President and COO of Qualcomm and talked about the company's current projects.|Short Read
Lurie Nanofab lab workers at a computer

Image processing 1,000 times faster is goal of new $5M contract

Lu plans to design and fabricate a computer chip based on so-called self-organizing, adaptive neural networks.|Medium Read
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Faster, more powerful mobile devices: U-M startup Crossbar could disrupt the memory market

RRAM is a new form of nonvolatile memory that has the potential to replace the flash memory commonly used in tablets, digital cameras and solid-state drives.|Short Read