Advanced Materials

More Advanced Materials News
four layers of nanowires

Synthetic tooth enamel may lead to more resilient structures

Tooth enamel has changed very little over millions of years -- and it is remarkably resistant to shock and wear. |Medium Read
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Quantum limits to heat flow observed at room temperature

Quantum mechanics governs the flow of heat in atoms and Michigan Engineers have directly measured a "quantum of thermal conductance" at room temperature. |Medium Read
Computer model of purple tetrahedra beginning crystallization.

A crystal ball for crystal formation

Studying the role of shape in self-assembly came up accidentally as Sharon Glotzer and her colleagues were studying the properties of semiconducting nanoparticles their U-M colleagues produced.|Medium Read
Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences

Toward safer, long-life nuclear reactors

Metal alloy design could raise radiation resistance by 100 times.|Medium Read
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Ushering in the next generation of flat-panel displays and medical imagers

Prof. Kanicki expects breakthroughs in both the flat-panel display and imager industries using his-ITZO TFT technology in the near future.|Short Read
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Nanoshells: Potential catalysts and cradles of life

Virus-sized mineral shells could help drive chemical reactions, perhaps forming self-replicating systems.|Medium Read
Siqian-Shen. Photo by Joseph Xu, College of Engineering

Henry Sodano promoted to AIAA Associate Fellow

Aerospace Engineering Associate Professor Henry Sodano has been promoted to an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Associate Fellow.|Short Read
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Lithium ion batteries: Why they explode

When we hear of a cell phone, laptop, or car battery exploding, that can rightfully be a cause for concern.|Short Read
Battery viewed through visualization chamber

A window into battery life for next-gen lithium cells

Watching electrodes degrade could help battery researchers take lithium to the next level.|Medium Read
blue and red dots for wavy lines that are sandwiched together.

“Atomic sandwiches” could make computers 100X greener

Researchers have engineered a material that could lead to a new generation of computing devices, packing in more computing power while consuming a fraction of the energy that today’s electronics require.|Medium Read
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Student workshop approaches research with the market in mind

A one-day crash course in tech entrepreneurship teaches students and post-docs how to evaluate the market potential of new technologies.|Medium Read
A computer simulation of a model bird

High-tech bird watching for shapeshifting airplane wings

An international team of engineers and biologists will gain unprecedented insights into how birds fly so efficiently and then turn that knowledge to building unmanned aircraft with shapeshifting wings. These planes should be lighter, faster and dramatically more maneuverable than today’s stiff-winged aircraft.|Medium Read