Materials Science and Engineering

More Materials Science and Engineering News
Yoonseob Kim, ChE PhD Student, showcases the material used to make a flexible film that induces circular polarization of light.

Flexible film may lead to phone-sized cancer detector

A thin, stretchable film that can coil light waves like a Slinky could usher in more precise, less expensive monitoring for cancer survivors, helping them get better treatment with less disruption to their everyday lives.|Medium Read
Packets of silica gel dessicant.

Carbon-neutral process turns rice waste into silica compounds

Two U-M researchers turn useless waste from rice processing into the high-purity silica compounds that are used in everything from toothpaste to tires.|Medium Read

Heat radiates 10,000 times faster at the nanoscale

In a unique ultra-low vibration lab, engineers have, for the first time, measured how heat radiates from one surface to another in a vacuum at distances down to 2 nanometers.|Short Read
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New chemical process could lead to high-efficiency LEDs

University of Michigan researchers has developed a new process that can improve the efficiency of the of metal-free organic phosphors that could be the key to phosphorescent LEDs.|Short Read
Portrait of Richard Laine

U-M Professor wins Green Chemistry Governor’s Award

MSE professor Richard Laine has won the Michigan Governor’s 2015 Green Chemistry Award|Short Read
Tour of Michigan Ion Beam Lab

$3M upgrade complete at leading lab for emulating radiation damage

With new equipment that makes it the best in the world for quickly recreating the radiation damage sustained by materials inside nuclear reactors, the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (MIBL) marked its grand re-opening yesterday.|Medium Read
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Nanotech: the new alchemy

Researchers at the University of Michigan are charting a path toward materials with new properties by cleverly altering the nanoparticles used to build them.|Medium Read
Portrait of Jay Whitacre.

Michigan Engineering alum receives Lemelson-MIT Prize

U-M MSE alum, Jay Whitacre, is being recognized for his work inventing the Aqueous Hybrid Ion battery.|Short Read
Side profile of dynamic kirigami structure

Art-inspired solar cells

Kirigami could be the key to flat, lightweight solar cells that can track the sun across the sky.|Medium Read
Nicholas A. Kotov

Nicholas Kotov

Engineering professor Nicholas Kotov has been drawn to one scientific field or another for as long as he can remember - biology, chemistry, zoology, geology. And before all that, pyrotechnics.|Medium Read
Conductor is tested in a lab

Kirigami art could enable stretchable plasma screens

The art of paper cutting may slice through a roadblock on the way to flexible, stretchable electronics, a team of engineers and an artist at the University of Michigan has found.|Short Read
Conference room full of people

Black engineering leaders outline goals at national conference

As part of its plan to nearly triple the annual number of black engineering graduates nationwide by 2025, the National Society of Black Engineers recently gathered about 175 newly elected student leaders and staff members from chapters across the country at U-M for its National Leadership Conference, held June 3-6.|Medium Read