Materials Science and Engineering

featured Materials Science and Engineering stories
an example of the erasing message

Burn after reading

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech.|Medium Read

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat

By reflecting nearly all the light they can’t turn into electricity, they help pave the way for storing renewable energy as heat.|Medium Read
Robot with structural batteries

Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells

The researchers compare them to fat deposits in living creatures.|Medium Read
Holding a sample of the solar cell

Urban solar energy: Solar panels for windows hit record 8% efficiency

Transparent solar panels on windows could take a bite out of a building’s electricity needs.|Medium Read
Artist rendering of COVID-19

COVID-19 is laying waste to many US recycling programs

'The trends we see in the making and consuming of single-use goods, particularly plastic, could have lasting negative effects on the circular economy.'|Short Read
Shilva Shrestha, Environmental Engineering PhD Student, has her temperature checked by Bryan Daniels, DPSS Quartermaster, at the entrance the G.G. Brown Building on North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI on May 26, 2020.

Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

'Noncritical' in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.|Medium Read
Illustration of molecules

Designing lightweight glass for efficient cars and wind turbines

Lighter, stiffer glass fibers could make composite materials thinner without sacrificing strength. |Medium Read
University of Michigan engineers professor Katsuyo Thornton, left, and graduate student Erik Hanson. Photo courtesy Paul Braun

Researchers gain control over internal structure of self-assembled composite materials

Researchers new templating technique instills greater order and gives rise to new 3D structures in a special class of high-performance materials, called eutectics.|Medium Read
Ashwin Shahani and Saman Moniri work in the lab

How an age-old process could lead to new materials and even invisibility

A Q&A with Ashwin Shahani, U-M assistant professor of materials science and engineering |Medium Read
Powder about to be prepared

Post-silicon computing gets one step closer

Tunable semiconductor could lead to faster, more efficient computers|Medium Read
Mollusks

Cracking the mystery of nature’s toughest material

How mollusks engineered the most advanced nanostructure on Earth |Medium Read
Eyke holds the kirigami in hand

Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training

Low-cost sensors could one day enable patients to log exercise and track progress in a smartphone app|Medium Read