Chemical Engineering

featured Chemical Engineering stories
New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
Michigan Chemical Engineering logo

ChE stands united against racism

Sharon Glotzer, the Anthony C. Lembke Department Chair of Chemical Engineering, addresses the ChE community and shares support for the Black Lives Matter movement|Short Read
image of Susan Montgomery

Dr. Susan Montgomery retires from Chemical Engineering after 27 years

Montgomery transitions to a three-year period of phased retirement during which she will serve the College of Engineering as an academic coach|Short Read
These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.|Medium Read

Chemical engineering graduate students explain how they adjusted to COVID-19

|Short Read

Chemical Engineering graduate recruitment goes virtual

|Long Read
Rich Lesser feature shot

Rich Lesser (BSE ’83), CEO of BCG, to give virtual commencement address to Michigan graduating seniors

Lesser recalls graduating during a recession when job prospects were bleak.|Short Read
a woman wearing a face shield

U-M-approved face shield design guides makers addressing the PPE shortage through 3D printing

As Ann Arbor’s maker community sprang into action making face shields, Michigan Medicine and the U-M College of Engineering offered a recommended design that is effective and straightforward to produce.|Medium Read

Congratulations to the ChE class of 2020!

The department, College, and University are making plans for remote celebrations in honor of the graduating class.|Short Read
Jouha Min

Successful 2020 ChE Faculty Search

Department moves final interviews online|Short Read
image of ChE 460 presentation online

ChE Classes during COVID-19

Teaching and learning online during the pandemic.|Medium Read