Chemical Engineering

featured Chemical Engineering stories
A closer look at two catalyst reactions

Chemistry and energy: Machine learning to understand catalyst interactions

Toward harnessing machine learning to design the materials we want.|Medium Read
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Bryan Goldsmith is recognized by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Named to AIChE's "35 under 35" list in honor of his accomplishments in energy and environmental research|Short Read

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat

By reflecting nearly all the light they can’t turn into electricity, they help pave the way for storing renewable energy as heat.|Medium Read

Michigan Chemical Engineering undergraduate program enters top 5 in U.S. News rankings

Chemical Engineering is tied at No. 4 in the U.S. News’s 2021 chemical engineering undergraduate program rankings|Short Read
Lissa MacVean, a lecturer in civil and environmental engineering, teaches her graduate course outside. Photo by Joseph Xu

Caution and connection in in-person classes during COVID-19

Faculty members and students share their perspectives.|Medium Read
Ensafi portrait

U-M spinout Asalyxa Bio developing inflammatory treatment platform, aiding COVID-19 patients

The company’s technology delivers an anti-inflammatory agent directly to overreactive neutrophils, minimizing harm from “cytokine storms.”|Medium Read
Robot with structural batteries

Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells

The researchers compare them to fat deposits in living creatures.|Medium Read
image of Susan M. Montgomery

Susan Montgomery retires to academic coaching role

Her colleagues and former students talk about the impact she has had on the department and thank her for her support and dedication to students and education.|Long Read
New Michigan Medicine research uncovers how pancreatic cancer cells (right) reprogram cancer-associated fibroblasts (left), setting in motion a process that converts available nutrients into a form more easily used by the cancer cells: branched-chain alpha-ketoacids (BCKAs). The researchers believe new therapies could potentially short-circuit this process.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.|Medium Read
White blood cells called neutrophils, tagged with fluorescent red dye, eat spheres or rods that have been tagged with green dye. Because neutrophils are more willing to eat rods than are other immune cells, an injection of rod-shaped particles could be used to target neutrophils specifically. Earlier work in mice from the Eniola-Adefeso group suggests that injections of spheres can reduce excessive inflammation in the lungs. Credit: Hanieh Safari, Eniola-Adefeso Lab, University of Michigan.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.|Medium Read
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ChE stands united against racism

Sharon Glotzer, the Anthony C. Lembke Department Chair of Chemical Engineering, addresses the ChE community and shares support for the Black Lives Matter movement|Short Read
image of Susan Montgomery

Dr. Susan Montgomery retires from Chemical Engineering after 27 years

Montgomery transitions to a three-year period of phased retirement during which she will serve the College of Engineering as an academic coach|Short Read