Biomedical Engineering

featured Biomedical Engineering stories
A man stacks cubes using a prosthetic arm

‘It’s like you have a hand again’

An ultra-precise mind-controlled prosthetic|Medium Read
Sriram works at his computer

Deep learning AI discovers surprising new antibiotics

Deep-learning AI will help keep us ahead of drug resistant pathogens.|Short Read
Sriram works at his computer

How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

A new method could replace trial and error drug development|Medium Read
Artistic render of cells in the body

Implantable cancer traps could provide earlier diagnosis and help monitor treatment

Synthetic scaffolding could detect multiple types of cancers before they start to spread.|Medium Read
An overhead 3D rendering of the planned design space renovation.

Regents approve first floor renovations in Biomedical Engineering building

New space will support experiential learning and collaboration opportunities for students.|Medium Read
The summer sun rises on North Campus

Global health pioneer honored with recent alumni award

The award, among the highest accolades given by the Michigan Engineering Alumni Board, honors an alumnus/a who has contributed substantially to their field and has either graduated from the college within the last ten years or is no more than 35 years old.|Short Read
Fibronectin network with cells.

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

While previous structures guessed at the environment that cells would want, the new design lets the cells build to their own specifications.|Medium Read
Biomedical Engineering graduate student research assistant Menglian Zhou, adjusts the lung monitoring device.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.|Medium Read
Inspecting the injectable bone graft.

Injectable ‘bone spackling’: A cell therapy approach to heal complex fractures

A Q&A with biomedical engineering professor Jan Stegemann, whose work in mice shows the promise of ‘microtissues.’|Medium Read
Illustration of the human body showing the skeletal system, with the lower spine highlighted in red to indicate pain spots

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.|Medium Read
A doctor uses a stethoscope to examine another person

Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness

Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.|Medium Read
Seen under a confocal fluorescent microscope, germ cells appear as green.

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

New approach can boost ovarian follicle survival in mice by up to 75 percent.|Medium Read