Biomedical Engineering

featured Biomedical Engineering stories

Toward a stem cell model of human nervous system development

Human cells could one day show us more about why neural tube birth defects occur and how to prevent them. |Medium Read
A microscopic image of a human tumor xenograft that glows red and blue from fluorescent dyes.

Findings in mice show pill for breast cancer diagnosis may outperform mammograms

A new kind of imaging could distinguish aggressive tumors from benign, preventing unnecessary breast cancer treatments.|Medium Read
Close-up of 3D bacteria

‘Nightmare bacteria:’ Michigan Engineers discuss how to combat antibiotic resistance

Drug-resistant bugs are on the rise and new approaches are needed.|Medium Read
Concentrated surgeon performing surgery with her team

No sponge left behind: tags for surgical equipment

A simple, easy-to-implement technology could prevent the debilitating injuries that can occur when organs are damaged by surgical tools left in the body.|Medium Read
Human hand holding the everter device

Reconstructive surgery tech

Born in an engineering class, now the ‘arterial everter’ has been licensed to Baxter.|Medium Read
5 researchers work with computer sensors

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Powered by a broadband infrared laser, the device can zero in on the ‘spectral fingerprint region’.|Medium Read

Artificial cartilage made from Kevlar mimics the magic of the real thing

In spite of being 80 percent water, cartilage is tough stuff. Now, a synthetic material can pack even more H2O without compromising on strength.|Medium Read

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

White blood cells get busy taking out the trash - it could be a lifesaver when the immune system goes haywire.|Short Read
nerve cells

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.|Short Read

Fighting cancer with cancer: 3D cultured cells could drive precision therapy

U-M researchers have devised a process that can grow hundreds of cultured cancer cell masses, called spheroids, from just a few tumor cells derived from a patient.|Medium Read

Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistance

An in-depth look at the work of T-cells, the body's bacteria killers, could provide a roadmap to effective drug treatments.|Medium Read

Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center

Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.|Medium Read