By Department

Glen Daigger

Glen Daigger Joins International Scientific Advisory Committee

CEE professor invited to join the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences’ International Scientific Advisory Committee.|Short Read
CYGNSS in orbit

Deciphering GPS satellites to see inside hurricanes

To dial in on exact wind speeds, researchers needed to reverse engineering the signals from satellites.|Medium Read
Industrial & Operations Engineering logo

Professor Nadine Sarter receives funding for a three-year project on human-robot interaction from DoD/Department of the Air Force

Supporting trust calibration and attention management in human-machine teams|Short Read
Nathan Taylor inspects a piece of lithium metal. Photo: Evan Dougherty/Michigan Engineering

Battery breakthrough: Doubling performance with lithium metal that doesn’t catch fire

Longer-lasting drop-in replacements for lithium ion could be on the horizon.|Medium Read
A close up of a computer chip

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

Patches can provide protection.|Medium Read
An artist’s rendering of the Parker Solar Probe approaching the sun

Touching the Sun to protect the Earth

A Q&A with Justin Kasper on going where no probe has gone before.|Medium Read
Members of the Parker Solar Probe team examine and align one of the spacecraft’s two solar arrays on May 31, 2018. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman

Part 7: The end of the mission

The clock on the Parker Solar Probe will start ticking when it runs out of fuel used to make the attitude adjustments necessary to keep the craft’s key components protected behind the heat shield. |Short Read
The Delta IV Heavy will launch NASA's upcoming Parker Solar Probe mission in July 2018. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

Part 6: The big send-off

The power and fuel capacity of the Delta IV, along with an eventual gravity assist from Venus, will get the solar probe velocity down to a point where it can orbit the sun.|Short Read
Parker Solar Probe’s heat shield arrives in Florida on April 18, 2018, and is unloaded at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, where it will eventually be reattached to the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft before launch in late July. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman

Part 5: Sunblock and instrumentation

The extreme conditions of the corona are one of the main reasons a solar probe mission like this hasn’t been undertaken before. But Parker features a series of innovations that will allow the probe to get close enough to do what needs to be done. |Short Read
Michigan Engineer Levi Weintraub pauses to enjoy the sunset near Nampula, Mozambique.

Two-wheeled teacher

7,500 miles of riding, wrenching and coding.|Short Read
Preparing for the Parker Solar Probe launch meant plenty of calculations and testing to get everything right. Photo: Levi Hutmacher/Michigan Engineering, Communications & Marketing

Part 4: Using the gravity of Venus to reach the sun

While NASA never intended for the probe to return to Earth, Venus represents a point of no return. |Short Read
MDST at Quicken Loans

Michigan Data Science Team wrangles big data

MDST brings together students from many fields to get their hands dirty with real data science problems and tools.|Medium Read