The Michigan Engineer News Center

U-M Aerospace Engineering scholars win the ASME Best Paper award for their work on nanowire vibration-tamping study

PhD Candidates LoriAnne Groo and Kelsey Steinke, Harm Buning Collegiate Professor of Aerospace Engineering Daniel J Inman, and Professor of Aerospace Engineering Henry A Sodano have been awarded the prestigious Best Paper award by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).| Short Read
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IMAGE:  Portrait of LoriAnne Groo and Kelsey Steinke

PhD Candidates LoriAnne Groo and Kelsey Steinke, Harm Buning Collegiate Professor of Aerospace Engineering Daniel J. Inman, and Professor of Aerospace Engineering Henry Sodano have been awarded the prestigious Best Paper award by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for their publication, “Vibration Damping Mechanism of Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Integrated Piezoelectric Nanowires.”

Nanowires have been studied for years as a way to make composite materials stronger, but the new approach is to use them as a way to reduce the effects of vibrations by using the nanowires to counteract them. In the study by Groo, Steinke, Inman, and Sodano, looked at how the nanowires affect vibration damping in the fiber reinforced composites. To do this, they grew piezoelectric and non piezoelectric nanowires on the surface of carbon fibers which were then cured in an epoxy matrix. Their study investigated how the mechanical and piezoelectric nanostructures affected damping to ascertain the contribution of mechanical interaction across the nanostructured interface and the effect of piezoelectric coupling. The study was the first to separate the effects of electroelastic coupling and elastic behavior on the damping of the materials.

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IMAGE:  Barium Titanate Nanowires that were grown on the surface of carbon fibers.

Outside the laboratory, the results have the potential to produce aircraft with improved aeroelastic stability.  The materials also show a unique trend of increased stiffness and damping, two properties that are typically in an inverse relationship.

“The ASME award is for papers focusing on structural dynamics and published in any archival journal in 2019, creating a very competitive award,” said Sodano.

The paper was published in ACS Appl Mater Interfaces.

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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

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